Hot Best Seller

Sick and Tired: An Intimate History of Fatigue

Availability: Ready to download

Medicine finally has discovered fatigue. Recent articles about various diseases conclude that fatigue has been underrecognized, underdiagnosed, and undertreated. Scholars in the social sciences and humanities have also ignored the phenomenon. As a result, we know little about what it means to live with this condition, especially given its diverse symptoms and causes. Emily Medicine finally has discovered fatigue. Recent articles about various diseases conclude that fatigue has been underrecognized, underdiagnosed, and undertreated. Scholars in the social sciences and humanities have also ignored the phenomenon. As a result, we know little about what it means to live with this condition, especially given its diverse symptoms and causes. Emily K. Abel offers the first history of fatigue, one that is scrupulously researched but also informed by her own experiences as a cancer survivor. Abel reveals how the limits of medicine and the American cultural emphasis on productivity intersect to stigmatize those with fatigue. Without an agreed-upon approach to confirm the problem through medical diagnosis, it is difficult to convince others that it is real. When fatigue limits our ability to work, our society sees us as burdens or worse. With her engaging and informative style, Abel gives us a synthetic history of fatigue and elucidates how it has been ignored or misunderstood, not only by medical professionals but also by American society as a whole.


Compare

Medicine finally has discovered fatigue. Recent articles about various diseases conclude that fatigue has been underrecognized, underdiagnosed, and undertreated. Scholars in the social sciences and humanities have also ignored the phenomenon. As a result, we know little about what it means to live with this condition, especially given its diverse symptoms and causes. Emily Medicine finally has discovered fatigue. Recent articles about various diseases conclude that fatigue has been underrecognized, underdiagnosed, and undertreated. Scholars in the social sciences and humanities have also ignored the phenomenon. As a result, we know little about what it means to live with this condition, especially given its diverse symptoms and causes. Emily K. Abel offers the first history of fatigue, one that is scrupulously researched but also informed by her own experiences as a cancer survivor. Abel reveals how the limits of medicine and the American cultural emphasis on productivity intersect to stigmatize those with fatigue. Without an agreed-upon approach to confirm the problem through medical diagnosis, it is difficult to convince others that it is real. When fatigue limits our ability to work, our society sees us as burdens or worse. With her engaging and informative style, Abel gives us a synthetic history of fatigue and elucidates how it has been ignored or misunderstood, not only by medical professionals but also by American society as a whole.

31 review for Sick and Tired: An Intimate History of Fatigue

  1. 4 out of 5

    Taylor

    sometimes you decided to read a book because the cover is cool, and then the book changes your life. Sick and Tired is a wonderful hybrid of history and memoir. perhaps what's most compelling is what Abel discusses at the conclusion of her book: the narratives and lens used to study the history of illness helped her gain perspective on her own cancer diagnosis and following fatigue. as a cancer survivor myself, this book felt like finally meeting someone who understands you completely! i really sometimes you decided to read a book because the cover is cool, and then the book changes your life. Sick and Tired is a wonderful hybrid of history and memoir. perhaps what's most compelling is what Abel discusses at the conclusion of her book: the narratives and lens used to study the history of illness helped her gain perspective on her own cancer diagnosis and following fatigue. as a cancer survivor myself, this book felt like finally meeting someone who understands you completely! i really enjoyed the structure of the book. i actually find historians who include their connections to the subject material way more engaging as a reader. i found the sections on the links between fatigue and capitalism SO interesting (especially the idea that rest is not for the self but for productivity!). my biggest critique of the book would be: where was hysteria!?! it was mentioned near the end but was largely absent from the sections of neurasthenia. i know it technically fits under that umbrella but i wanted more women's history before the ending chapter! thanks to netgalley for the arc

  2. 4 out of 5

    Fern Adams

    ‘Sick and Tired’ is a book written by a medical historian on the subject of fatigue and how it has been perceived throughout history. It is a short yet fascinating book that covers a lot succinctly. Abel, the writer, was diagnosed with cancer and was surprised at the level of fatigue that persisted after chemo and the cancer went into remission. She writes academically on the subject of fatigue and yet with use of case studies, anecdotes, various studies and literary references this is far from ‘Sick and Tired’ is a book written by a medical historian on the subject of fatigue and how it has been perceived throughout history. It is a short yet fascinating book that covers a lot succinctly. Abel, the writer, was diagnosed with cancer and was surprised at the level of fatigue that persisted after chemo and the cancer went into remission. She writes academically on the subject of fatigue and yet with use of case studies, anecdotes, various studies and literary references this is far from dull and the reader is kept engaged. The book looks at fatigue in relation to religion, the effect capitalism had on ideas of work, rest and illness, scientific approaches and how today there is still such a stigma attached despite an increased effort to change this. I really enjoyed this and thought Abel tackled what is a very big subject well and sensitively. It’s clear from this how much biases on fatigue play such a large role in how it’s dealt with or not and the negative impact this has on sufferers. Perfect for anyone working in health or social care, anyone who wants more insight and people who struggle with fatigue as a result of illness. Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for sending me an ARC in exchange for an honest review.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Ula Tardigrade

    A very thorough and detailed examination of a long-neglected affliction: chronic fatigue. The author is a victim of it herself, suffering from exhaustion for many years after successful cancer treatment. As an academic, she decided to confront it on her turf: doing scientific research and querying the sources. She studies the phenomenon itself and everything related to it: stress, depression, rest, energy boosters, and many other things. I think that this work is especially relevant today, with A very thorough and detailed examination of a long-neglected affliction: chronic fatigue. The author is a victim of it herself, suffering from exhaustion for many years after successful cancer treatment. As an academic, she decided to confront it on her turf: doing scientific research and querying the sources. She studies the phenomenon itself and everything related to it: stress, depression, rest, energy boosters, and many other things. I think that this work is especially relevant today, with chronic fatigue experienced by many COVID "long-haulers". Thanks to the publisher, University of North Carolina Press, and NetGalley for the advance copy of this book.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Kristine

    Sick and Tired by Emily K. Abel is a free NetGalley ebook that I read in early March. Understanding fatigue, its history, illusiveness, prominence, stereotypes in pop culture, Abel's experiences, and treating it - it comes off mildly like an academic paper, but there's a lot of heart, concern, empathy, and understanding, but also frustration toward public opinion on interpersonal productivity and people who have fatigue-related symptoms & side effects. Sick and Tired by Emily K. Abel is a free NetGalley ebook that I read in early March. Understanding fatigue, its history, illusiveness, prominence, stereotypes in pop culture, Abel's experiences, and treating it - it comes off mildly like an academic paper, but there's a lot of heart, concern, empathy, and understanding, but also frustration toward public opinion on interpersonal productivity and people who have fatigue-related symptoms & side effects.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jen Juenke

    OH my goodness, I love it when a book teaches me something that I had no idea about. I seriously though that Chronic Fatigue Syndrome was just NOT getting enough sleep. She patiently described exactly what she felt like, how her life had changed, and how horrendous it was. The author shared her personal experience, but also dove deeper. She brought up the history of fatigue, bed rest, and exercise programs as cures for malaise. Usually I say that books need to be longer, this is one book, where I OH my goodness, I love it when a book teaches me something that I had no idea about. I seriously though that Chronic Fatigue Syndrome was just NOT getting enough sleep. She patiently described exactly what she felt like, how her life had changed, and how horrendous it was. The author shared her personal experience, but also dove deeper. She brought up the history of fatigue, bed rest, and exercise programs as cures for malaise. Usually I say that books need to be longer, this is one book, where I learned so much, that I needed it to be longer. I truly appreciated this book and every person who knows someone going through cancer treatments, chronic Fatigue syndrome, or just a little down should read this book. Thanks to Netgalley and the publisher for allowing me early access to this fantastic book in exchange for this review.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Shiori

  7. 4 out of 5

    Sandra

  8. 5 out of 5

    Leo

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jaidee

  10. 5 out of 5

    mad mags

  11. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

  12. 5 out of 5

    Zoe Jackson

  13. 4 out of 5

    Grace

  14. 5 out of 5

    Tiffany

  15. 4 out of 5

    Rochelle

  16. 5 out of 5

    Ana

  17. 5 out of 5

    Creolecat

  18. 4 out of 5

    Ashe Dryden

  19. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth

  20. 5 out of 5

    Katie Z

  21. 5 out of 5

    Caitlin Herring

  22. 5 out of 5

    Kyla

  23. 4 out of 5

    Anna Marie

  24. 5 out of 5

    Katie Campbell

  25. 5 out of 5

    Hedda Pamp

  26. 5 out of 5

    Elspeth G. Perkin

  27. 5 out of 5

    emma woodhead

  28. 5 out of 5

    Olivia Spring

  29. 5 out of 5

    Autumn

  30. 4 out of 5

    Bridget

  31. 5 out of 5

    Kate

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

hi
Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.