Hot Best Seller

Unwell Women: Misdiagnosis and Myth in a Man-Made World

Availability: Ready to download

A trailblazing, conversation-starting history of women's health--from the earliest medical ideas about women's illnesses to hormones and autoimmune diseases--brought together in a fascinating sweeping narrative. Elinor Cleghorn became an unwell woman ten years ago. She was diagnosed with an autoimmune disease after a long period of being told her symptoms were anything f A trailblazing, conversation-starting history of women's health--from the earliest medical ideas about women's illnesses to hormones and autoimmune diseases--brought together in a fascinating sweeping narrative. Elinor Cleghorn became an unwell woman ten years ago. She was diagnosed with an autoimmune disease after a long period of being told her symptoms were anything from psychosomatic to a possible pregnancy. As Elinor learned to live with her unpredictable disease she turned to history for answers, and found an enraging legacy of suffering, mystification, and misdiagnosis. In Unwell Women, Elinor Cleghorn traces the almost unbelievable history of how medicine has failed women by treating their bodies as alien and other, often to perilous effect. The result is an authoritative and groundbreaking exploration of the relationship between women and medical practice, from the wandering womb of Ancient Greece to the rise of witch trials across Europe, and from the dawn of hysteria as a catchall for difficult-to-diagnose disorders to the first forays into autoimmunity and the shifting understanding of hormones, menstruation, menopause, and conditions like endometriosis. Packed with character studies and case histories of women who have suffered, challenged, and rewritten medical orthodoxy--and the men who controlled their fate--this is a revolutionary examination of the relationship between women, illness, and medicine. With these case histories, Elinor pays homage to the women who suffered so strides could be made, and shows how being unwell has become normalized in society and culture, where women have long been distrusted as reliable narrators of their own bodies and pain. But the time for real change is long overdue: answers reside in the body, in the testimonies of unwell women--and their lives depend on medicine learning to listen.


Compare

A trailblazing, conversation-starting history of women's health--from the earliest medical ideas about women's illnesses to hormones and autoimmune diseases--brought together in a fascinating sweeping narrative. Elinor Cleghorn became an unwell woman ten years ago. She was diagnosed with an autoimmune disease after a long period of being told her symptoms were anything f A trailblazing, conversation-starting history of women's health--from the earliest medical ideas about women's illnesses to hormones and autoimmune diseases--brought together in a fascinating sweeping narrative. Elinor Cleghorn became an unwell woman ten years ago. She was diagnosed with an autoimmune disease after a long period of being told her symptoms were anything from psychosomatic to a possible pregnancy. As Elinor learned to live with her unpredictable disease she turned to history for answers, and found an enraging legacy of suffering, mystification, and misdiagnosis. In Unwell Women, Elinor Cleghorn traces the almost unbelievable history of how medicine has failed women by treating their bodies as alien and other, often to perilous effect. The result is an authoritative and groundbreaking exploration of the relationship between women and medical practice, from the wandering womb of Ancient Greece to the rise of witch trials across Europe, and from the dawn of hysteria as a catchall for difficult-to-diagnose disorders to the first forays into autoimmunity and the shifting understanding of hormones, menstruation, menopause, and conditions like endometriosis. Packed with character studies and case histories of women who have suffered, challenged, and rewritten medical orthodoxy--and the men who controlled their fate--this is a revolutionary examination of the relationship between women, illness, and medicine. With these case histories, Elinor pays homage to the women who suffered so strides could be made, and shows how being unwell has become normalized in society and culture, where women have long been distrusted as reliable narrators of their own bodies and pain. But the time for real change is long overdue: answers reside in the body, in the testimonies of unwell women--and their lives depend on medicine learning to listen.

30 review for Unwell Women: Misdiagnosis and Myth in a Man-Made World

  1. 4 out of 5

    Éimhear (A Little Haze)

    Unwell Women is an utterly incredible book. It explores the history of women through the lens of medicine, and how the intrinsic patriarchal bias that exists within medicine has impacted on the lives of women down throughout the ages. In the book, author Elinor Cleghorn (herself an unwell woman), carefully details the history of medicine and the ways in which unwell women have not been listened to by the medical community, and how women as a whole have been denied agency over their own wellbeing Unwell Women is an utterly incredible book. It explores the history of women through the lens of medicine, and how the intrinsic patriarchal bias that exists within medicine has impacted on the lives of women down throughout the ages. In the book, author Elinor Cleghorn (herself an unwell woman), carefully details the history of medicine and the ways in which unwell women have not been listened to by the medical community, and how women as a whole have been denied agency over their own wellbeing and health. The book starts during ancient times and shows how the misogynistic idea that women are second class citizens and merely walking uteri whose only function is motherhood and the servitude of men ingrained itself into early medicine leading to the dismissal of women’s pain and illnesses, and instead cast women as hysterical and delicate beings, and painted the entire gender as being dictated by emotion. And this idea continued through the Middle Ages, Victorian Era, and beyond into modern medicine. The book is truly extensive and meticulous, in both its historical scope and the depth of research involved in its writing, as it thoroughly details how women’s anatomy and psychology were studied in ways that worked to oppress women in society. It’s chilling to see how much of women’s suffering was treated based on how it affected the males in these women’s lives. To many people this book might be eye opening to see the medical dismissal of women. But for me it wasn’t. Because I’m an unwell woman. I have been chronically ill all of my life. I have first hand experience of the dismissal of my medical complaints and the misogynistic attitudes of many of the medical practitioners that I’ve met along the way. To me this book felt like it gave voice to the myriad of women like me that suffer with mysterious and invisible illnesses. Cleghorn has highlighted the glaring inequalities in the medical system that we patients intimately know about, and I’m hopeful that this book will make its way into the hands of those who need to take stock and realise that women are suffering. Understand that there has been a bias in medicine as the medical standard has always been the white cis heterosexual male. Medicine has not been impartial, and sadly this has led to women suffering. The statistics show that women are more likely to have autoimmune diseases, and yet when so many female patients first present with symptoms of pain and malaise that are tricky to diagnose it frequently results in the medical professional deciding that it’s psychosomatic. The book also shines light on the racial bias in medicine and shows how Black women have been dehumanised, and are still being dehumanised to this day. There are harrowing accounts of experimental surgeries being carried out on enslaved women of colour, of sterilisations being carried out without consent, and a horrifically underhanded eugenicist attitude to providing birth control to Black women in the USA. Overall, Unwell Women is a devastating account of how preconceptions, myths, and the frequent misdiagnosis of diseases affecting women have persevered from the ancient era to the current day. Both the history and the science are explained in clear fashion, and even though it’s incredibly detailed it never feels too wordy. And the book’s overriding message is one that that still needs to be heard loud and clear by the medical profession today; believe women. A truly exceptional read. Trigger Warning As I mentioned in my review I’m an unwell woman. I have a number of chronic illnesses. It took over ten years for me to receive my major diagnosis and along the way I was the victim of medical gaslighting. Therefore, when reading this book I was frequently “gut punched” as it brought back a lot of painful memories. While I think this is an important read especially for those of us who are unwell women please do prepare yourself for an emotionally tough read. *An e-copy was kindly provided to me by the publisher via NetGalley for honest review* Publishing 10th June 2021, W&N For more reviews and book related chat check out my blog Follow me on Twitter Friend me on Goodreads

  2. 4 out of 5

    Siria

    This is a really tricky one to rate. On the one hand, Elinor Cleghorn writes with convincing passion about how the long-standing patriarchal biases of the medical profession have resulted in the misunderstanding of women's illnesses and suffering, and have often compounded them. (Cleghorn looks at western Europe fairly broadly in the early part of the book, but the closer she gets to the present day the more she focuses on Anglophone bio-medicine in the UK and US.) I appreciated her awareness of This is a really tricky one to rate. On the one hand, Elinor Cleghorn writes with convincing passion about how the long-standing patriarchal biases of the medical profession have resulted in the misunderstanding of women's illnesses and suffering, and have often compounded them. (Cleghorn looks at western Europe fairly broadly in the early part of the book, but the closer she gets to the present day the more she focuses on Anglophone bio-medicine in the UK and US.) I appreciated her awareness of how race and class affect how women are treated: wealthy white women might be patronised or infantilised about their illnesses, but Black women's pain is often dismissed by physicians as non-existent. Some of the events Cleghorn recounts are really horrific, like the early testing of the contraceptive pill on poor and mostly illiterate Puerto Rican women who were unable to give informed consent and who suffered horrific side effects. On the other hand, Cleghorn isn't actually a trained historian of medicine (her Ph.D. is in "humanities and cultural studies", and her dissertation appears to have been on twentieth-century dance and film studies), and it shows. Her understanding of ancient and medieval history simply isn't strong, either in the general terms or in the specifics of medical history. There are factual errors (no, Gutenberg didn't invent the printing press in 1500; no, dissection was not illegal in the Middle Ages), simplistic presentations of medieval women like Jacoba Felicie and Trota (the yas queen framing of the latter in particular had me side-eyeing), and an overall reliance on cliché not grounded in any real knowledge of pre-modern history (the Middle Ages as a "time of superstition" while the eighteenth-century was one of enlightenment—both characterisations that don't quite work because they're founded on a Whiggish belief in history as an upward trajectory). Cleghorn is writing with the goal of improving the lot of women in the present day, and that is an admirable goal! But at least in the earlier chapters of the book I could see a tendency on her part to highlight aspects of history that are more dramatic and emotive than necessarily illuminating for the topic at hand. Did the witchcraft trials (presented here as medieval but far more an early modern phenomenon) exert more of a force on how women were treated in medical situations than, say, the development of coverture laws? I don't think so. But the former topic is "sexier" and more dramatic than the latter, and I imagine far better known. Plus, the fact that there medieval feme sole and that economic opportunities for women may well have constricted in the early modern period would be another point that would jar a bit with that Whiggish trajectory that is one of the book's unquestioned assumptions. Take my three-star rating here as being a rough average of her overall argument (five stars) and Unwell Women as a work of history (two stars).

  3. 4 out of 5

    Annie

    This is a compelling historical survey of the way that medicine has failed and exploited women since the Classical period and beyond. Cleghorn includes her own perspective as an unwell woman but it is primarily an objective account of the rhetoric that was and is used to control women's bodies, perpetuate myths about child-bearing being the raison d'être of every woman's life, and discredit women's accounts of illness while legitimizing men's accounts. I recommend this book to anyone who is inte This is a compelling historical survey of the way that medicine has failed and exploited women since the Classical period and beyond. Cleghorn includes her own perspective as an unwell woman but it is primarily an objective account of the rhetoric that was and is used to control women's bodies, perpetuate myths about child-bearing being the raison d'être of every woman's life, and discredit women's accounts of illness while legitimizing men's accounts. I recommend this book to anyone who is interested in an overview of the ways in which the medical and pharmaceutical fields are driven by outdated ideas about women's bodies. I received an ARC of this novel through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Tanja Berg

    This is a thorough journey through medicine and feminism. It shows how women's ails since the time of Hippocrates has been assigned to mental issues and hysteria. The assumptions made long before medicine existed as a discipline has continued to color diagnoses today. It's even worse if you're not white. Common debilitating women's illnesses such as endometriosis takes several years to diagnose, even though one in ten women suffer and are incapacitated for a couple of days a month. I am one of t This is a thorough journey through medicine and feminism. It shows how women's ails since the time of Hippocrates has been assigned to mental issues and hysteria. The assumptions made long before medicine existed as a discipline has continued to color diagnoses today. It's even worse if you're not white. Common debilitating women's illnesses such as endometriosis takes several years to diagnose, even though one in ten women suffer and are incapacitated for a couple of days a month. I am one of them. I am still undiagnosed because the gynecologist thinks the bumps he feels on my uterus are scar tissue. I have scar tissue, but it's not actually on the outside of my uterus since that was never cut. Two days a month, for decades, I take several grams of common pain medication to be able to function. I thought this was normal, because no one tells you that periods aren't actually supposed to be that painful. Women's pain though, according to the medical profession, is something to grin and bear. There are much worse examples, with worse consequences. The author takes us through history up to modern day. Along the way we meet the suffragettes and the women - and men - who stood up for women's rights. Many suffragettes were force fed in prison. Not to save them from starvation, but to torture and humiliate them. It's just a little over 100 years ago. The time that women could not rule over her own life is a blink of history ago, and the millennia of being chattel, still linger with us. The American abortion debacle was cast in another light with this book, although certainly not a more positive one, it's understandable. Women should - according to cis gender white men - have no right to their own bodies. For so long we have been nothing but wombs on legs. This book is well-written, interesting, horrifying and a must read for anyone who believes in equal rights. And also equal rights to being respected and being taken seriously in the doctor's office.

  5. 4 out of 5

    TL

    *via Overdrive app from the library * Narrator: 5 stars 🌟 Content: 5 stars 🌟 --- Highly recommend this to read with "Everything below the waist: Why Health Care needs a Feminist Revolution" by Jennifer Block as well. Both are important books 📚 I think everyone needs to read. I knew some of what this book talked about but it blew my mind how much I didn't know and some of these theories of how women's worked. I could see in some cases when they didn't know much but others.. I was constantly giving the *via Overdrive app from the library * Narrator: 5 stars 🌟 Content: 5 stars 🌟 --- Highly recommend this to read with "Everything below the waist: Why Health Care needs a Feminist Revolution" by Jennifer Block as well. Both are important books 📚 I think everyone needs to read. I knew some of what this book talked about but it blew my mind how much I didn't know and some of these theories of how women's worked. I could see in some cases when they didn't know much but others.. I was constantly giving the book "looks"/side-eye and flipping off the societal attitudes in many cases. One particular story made me nauseous... I have no words still for it. The thought crossed my mind from time to time, what would I have been told as someone with migraines/scoliosis/anxiety. I can imagine some of it. We still have some work left to do to fix medicine and I hope we can do it where its fair to everyone and no one is discouraged/dismissed. Words are failing me somewhat but I hope y0u check this book out and pass it on Take care everyone ❤ 🙏

  6. 4 out of 5

    Demelda Penkitty

    In Unwell Women Elinor Cleghorn unpacks the roots of the perpetual misunderstanding, mystification and misdiagnosis of women's bodies, and traces the journey from the 'wandering womb' of ancient Greece, the rise of witch trials in Medieval Europe, through the dawn of Hysteria, to modern day understandings of autoimmune diseases, the menopause and conditions like endometriosis. Packed with character studies of women who have suffered, challenged and rewritten medical orthodoxy - and drawing on he In Unwell Women Elinor Cleghorn unpacks the roots of the perpetual misunderstanding, mystification and misdiagnosis of women's bodies, and traces the journey from the 'wandering womb' of ancient Greece, the rise of witch trials in Medieval Europe, through the dawn of Hysteria, to modern day understandings of autoimmune diseases, the menopause and conditions like endometriosis. Packed with character studies of women who have suffered, challenged and rewritten medical orthodoxy - and drawing on her own experience of un-diagnosed Lupus disease - this is a ground-breaking and timely exposé of the medical world and woman's place within it. This book will resonate with any woman who has gone to the doctor with a medical complaint only to be sent away with a course of antidepressants because what they are experiencing is likely all in their head, Bias within medicine might not be as bad as it was, but it is still a long way from being eradicated. Unwell Women is a comprehensive and clearly communicated history of the way medicine and doctors have treated women throughout history. Starting in the ancient Greek times where any ailments women suffered were blamed on her "wandering uterus", to all women's ailments being blamed on hysteria and the weak female mind, forced hysterectomies and unneeded lobotomy. Whilst a good deal of this book made me feel angry, I can't lie I couldn't help but stifle some giggles during the Ancient Greek parts at the image of a wandering, mischievous uterus roaming around causing havoc! Unwell Women also examines the treatment of women today, with particular emphasis on chronic illness and how difficult it is for women to be believed and receive a diagnosis- their pain and symptoms being dismissed constantly and Dr Cleghorn pulls on her own experience of having Lupus. I would have like this section of the book to be longer and more of a focus than the past but overall it is a small part of the book. However, the book’s overriding message is one that that needs to be heard loud and clear by the medical profession today; believe women!! I came to this as an unwell woman I have a number of chronic illnesses. It took years for me to receive my major diagnosis and along the way I was most definitely the victim of medical gaslighting and it needs to stop. Hopefully books like this will help bring the horrendous treatment of many many women to the forefront.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Elana Maryles

    I expected to give this book a 5-star read. This is an issue very near and dear to my heart, and I have written about some of my own painful experiences of sexism and objectification in the medical system. The topic is crucial and timely. Overall, Cleghorn is a thorough researcher and engaging writer. And although some sections of this book have been written about elsewhere, she offers an interesting treatment of some of the issues, and makes some compelling new connections. For example, her dis I expected to give this book a 5-star read. This is an issue very near and dear to my heart, and I have written about some of my own painful experiences of sexism and objectification in the medical system. The topic is crucial and timely. Overall, Cleghorn is a thorough researcher and engaging writer. And although some sections of this book have been written about elsewhere, she offers an interesting treatment of some of the issues, and makes some compelling new connections. For example, her discussion of the impact of medical misogyny on the suffrage movement was eye-opening for me. Fascinating for sure. The part of this book that disturbs me is the complete absence of attention to fatophobia in treating women. In her introduction, for example, she details many intersections of oppression that women face, focusing on racial issues, which are certainly crucial. However, she neglects to even mention in a passing comment that women's body size is arguably the number one issue that keeps women today from getting the help that they need from the medical system. And this oversight continues through the entire book. The issue was constantly on my mind as I read this book, because the author focuses a lot on how the medical system reflects social constructs of correct femininity, especially on sexuality and reproduction. In this context, it strikes me that medical fatophobic misogyny is a modernized reflection of some of these issues. A woman who does not LOOK the way she is supposed to look is assumed to have incorrect sexuality. And also, is assumed to have all the qualities that go along with incorrect womanhood -- too much passion, too many opinions, not enough servitude. And this got me thinking a lot about what it means to be a woman who eats. How the medical establishment tells women to eat less. To feel less, to want less, to desire less. All these things are direct reflections of the kinds of messages women got from the medical system for centuries. The entire eat-less-as-healthy mantra of the medical establishment is little more than the latest iteration of doctors telling women to live a little less. The failure to include this whole issue in the book was frustrating for me. And it makes me wonder what the author actually THINKS about it. Because there are many people out there in the world, even otherwise feminist advocates, who still think that if women are "overweight" according to how western medicine defines overweight, then they SHOULD be put on a diet and they SHOULD be blamed for anything that goes wrong in their bodies and if they DON'T diet, then they have nobody to blame for themselves and don't be surprised or upset or angry if the doctor says something you don't like. It's your own fault for being fat.... as if medical fatophobia isn't an issue of discrimination of socially controlled femininity, like all the other topics raised in this book... I can't help but wonder why this author, who is powerful in her advocacy for women versus the medical establishment in some crucial areas, stopped short of advocating for women who face this kind of abuse on the basis of body size and appearance.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Annette Jordan

    Unwell Women: A Journey through Medicine and Myth in a Man Made World by Elinor Cleghorn is a concise account of how myth, misinformation and misdiagnosis of women's health issues has persisted to the current day where the understanding and treatment of unwell women still leaves much to be desired in far too many instances. Moving from ancient Greece and Rome through the Middle Ages, the Victorian Era and right up to the current day the author examines how the same ideas , often without any scien Unwell Women: A Journey through Medicine and Myth in a Man Made World by Elinor Cleghorn is a concise account of how myth, misinformation and misdiagnosis of women's health issues has persisted to the current day where the understanding and treatment of unwell women still leaves much to be desired in far too many instances. Moving from ancient Greece and Rome through the Middle Ages, the Victorian Era and right up to the current day the author examines how the same ideas , often without any scientific basis, held sway for centuries until they could finally be proven to be wrong. The author does an exceptional job of clearly explaining the history and the science so that the book flows well and the reader never feels bogged down in dates or details. The case studies she utilises are sometimes heart breaking, and often frustrating as we see women being mistreated, used as human guinea pigs for surgical experimentation , or dismissed and discredited when they are struggling with complex auto immune conditions. As someone who works in healthcare, I cannot say that I was shocked by what I read , but I am hopeful that things are changing, albeit slowly. I read and reviewed an ARC courtesy of NetGalley and the Publisher, all opinions are my own.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Erica

    Covers the history of western medical misogyny and, less extensively, racism, starting with Hippocrates and the ancient greeks, through the beginnings of the corona pandemic. For anyone already familiar with medical misogyny, there isn't much surprising in here, but this is a great primer or introduction to the subject for men, or people who haven't experienced, studied, or learned much about it. She's very careful to position her privilege throughout, and makes sure to include women of the glob Covers the history of western medical misogyny and, less extensively, racism, starting with Hippocrates and the ancient greeks, through the beginnings of the corona pandemic. For anyone already familiar with medical misogyny, there isn't much surprising in here, but this is a great primer or introduction to the subject for men, or people who haven't experienced, studied, or learned much about it. She's very careful to position her privilege throughout, and makes sure to include women of the global majority in her research with intention and care. The final chapter is about her own struggle with lupus, and her (mis)diagnosis, and experiences of medical misogyny despite all the admitted access and privilege she has as a (presumably middle class, though she doesn't say explicitly) white woman living in the UK. Listened to this as an audiobook, and found it engaging, distressing, and educational in equal parts. I'm waiting to get an ebook copy so I can see if there is a bibliography, because I'm interested in her sources.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

    I don’t speak often enough on this account about life as a chronically ill person. partly due to how much I chew the ear off people about it irl and on my other account, but mainly because it can be difficult to introduce that side of my life to people who aren’t aware of it. this reluctance rears its head for a lot of reasons; shame, difficulty coming to terms with how much my life has changed, exhaustion at having to explain myself over and over and this fear of being disbelieved or patronised I don’t speak often enough on this account about life as a chronically ill person. partly due to how much I chew the ear off people about it irl and on my other account, but mainly because it can be difficult to introduce that side of my life to people who aren’t aware of it. this reluctance rears its head for a lot of reasons; shame, difficulty coming to terms with how much my life has changed, exhaustion at having to explain myself over and over and this fear of being disbelieved or patronised. I have chronic sciatica, a condition that affects the nerves in my hips, upper legs and spine. many people will experience some form of this in their lifetime, however I experience it in the extremities. I suffered a fall as a teenager that left me temporarily and partially paralysed and incapacitated. Recovery was slow and thankfully, flare ups were rare and uncommon. however, as time goes on and the body changes, my flare ups have become more frequent and the pain has only become more crippling and debilitating. oftentimes, you can find me in bed looking more like the second picture than the first. it took me almost half a decade after my injury to receive a diagnosis. I wasn’t listened to on account of my age, not only by medical professionals but by some closest to me and was passed from specialist to specialist to be simply told there isn’t much to be done. in severe cases, degeneration can reach the point where wheelchair use is necessary and surgery is complicated. thankfully, I’ve managed to come to terms with my illness and manage my own needs and symptoms accordingly. I have a wonderful group of friends, family and work colleagues who listen to my needs and go above and beyond to meet and surpass them. however, I know my fortune is an exception and it does not cancel out how I and countless other women have been treated at the hands of medical professionals for centuries. in this brilliantly detailed account of medical history, cleghorn diligently documents the evolution of medical science from the ancient Greeks to today, with a personal recantation of her own experience with lupus. it should come as no surprise to any of us that medicine still has many significant strides to make to ensure that it’s an inclusive space not only for white women, but women of colour, trans women and disabled women, many of whom have faced the most gruelling hardships and cruelties in the name of medical science. I gained much more from this book than I expected; from knowledge on the historical abuse of women through unnecessary surgeries, confinement to hospitals for non-medical reasons, to exclusions from drug trials and experiments on women in the name of those drug trials. this book is equal parts horrifying, traumatising, astonishing and frightening as it is necessary. cleghorn’s writing, though at times too clinical in style for my tastes, is direct and matter of fact. she doesn’t shy away from presenting the horrific facts with the figures to back them up. it took me a while to digest this book in all its glory on account of the heavy subject matter and language, but I’m grateful to have had the opportunity to read and learn from it. the appalling way in which unwell women have been treated and continue to be treated today has left me in no doubt that we still have a long way to go in how women are treated by medicine. huge trigger warnings for surgical scenes, graphic descriptions of illness, historical ableism, sexism and racism, discussions of fertility, abortion and miscarriage. Thank you to W&N for my gifted copy!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Brooke

    Unwell Women: Misdiagnosis and Myth in a Man-Made World is an interesting exploration of how women have been failed by medicine throughout history. Unfortunately, I found many of the chapters were a bit dry and bogged down with too many examples. I really would have liked to spend more time learning about our recent history and the current experiences of women.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Kari

    This book was amazing. It flowed so well, while covering hundreds of years of how women have been treated by the field of medicine (in the US and UK). I'm not surprised by the history, but I still feel I learned a lot and there was a lot of research put into this book. Some quotes that briefly sum it up for me: "Outside reproduction and sexual health, virtually no attention was being paid to women's illnesses and diseases." "The fight to call our bodies our own continues." This book was amazing. It flowed so well, while covering hundreds of years of how women have been treated by the field of medicine (in the US and UK). I'm not surprised by the history, but I still feel I learned a lot and there was a lot of research put into this book. Some quotes that briefly sum it up for me: "Outside reproduction and sexual health, virtually no attention was being paid to women's illnesses and diseases." "The fight to call our bodies our own continues."

  13. 5 out of 5

    Tutankhamun18

    This book was incredibly interesting but for some reason it was often a bit dry or long winded and for periods I felt myself almost being a little bored. I think this was because the book was connected by the theme of womens health being ignored, dismissed as mental and valued only for reproduction throughout the book, rather than a particular opinion being argued or spun. Also,perhaps due to missing data, not enough of individuals own experiences were intervowen in the history. Therefore, a goo This book was incredibly interesting but for some reason it was often a bit dry or long winded and for periods I felt myself almost being a little bored. I think this was because the book was connected by the theme of womens health being ignored, dismissed as mental and valued only for reproduction throughout the book, rather than a particular opinion being argued or spun. Also,perhaps due to missing data, not enough of individuals own experiences were intervowen in the history. Therefore, a good introduction, but would be interested in more. I adored the last chapter, where the author write so well about her own experience of misdiagnosis and valuation only for reproduction. I think perhaps if a memoir blend style was used throughout it may have been more successful. Enjoy the acknowledgement of race, sexuality and binary vs fluid genders throughout - felt like an inclusive book.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Roo Phillips

    This book is incredible in many ways. As a man, I read it as a much needed book for men. The history of women's healthcare is tragic and infuriating. Yes, the world was different 50, 100, or 200 years ago, but that doesn't mean we shouldn't care about the history of how medically mistreated women have been over the years, nor does it mean that bad ideas and ill-treatments of the past no longer affect women today. The patriarchal order in medicine and politics was so complete, even just decades a This book is incredible in many ways. As a man, I read it as a much needed book for men. The history of women's healthcare is tragic and infuriating. Yes, the world was different 50, 100, or 200 years ago, but that doesn't mean we shouldn't care about the history of how medically mistreated women have been over the years, nor does it mean that bad ideas and ill-treatments of the past no longer affect women today. The patriarchal order in medicine and politics was so complete, even just decades ago, that its repercussions are still felt by women throughout the world. "Crazy" (to us now) ideas were put forth by leading and authoritative figures, ideas such as "you can't thread a moving needle." Or, women that complain of anything not understood by doctors are brushed aside as psychosomatic, feeble minded people who either aren't having enough babies or pleasing their husbands enough, are focusing too much on education or politics, and likely need to get back to the domestic basics for which their minds and bodies are suited. And should symptoms persist, they are prescribed a tranquilizer (doctors routinely avoided voicing that they didn't understand women's healthcare, avoided real diagnosis, avoided allowing women to study medicine, and offered pain killers for their "emotionally induced" symptoms). Or, women should have their clitoris' removed because masturbation (for women) only leads them into debauchery, sexual insanity, and poor health. This ultimately leads them away from pleasing their husband, having babies, and keeping the house in order, which is their purpose. This book is a fantastic case for the reality that ideal morals and social mores are utterly constructed by humans according to the thinking and education of the times. Cleghorn masterfully shows how, over the centuries, what is normal, what is right/wrong, or what one should or should not do perpetually changes as new learning, strong voices, and scientific breakthroughs occur. This surely can be demonstrated in many fields, but it shines in the history of women's healthcare.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Allison

    Unwell Women is a sweeping historical look at how women have suffered as patients at the hands of Western medicine, from ancient Greece to present. Peppered with historical case studies and the author's own heart-wrenching journey to a lupus diagnosis, the voices of women rise up through the narrative to be heard where they are so frequently suppressed. Cleghorn's dry humor was much appreciated throughout this journey to balance the horrific nature of the trends and stories she shares. I found th Unwell Women is a sweeping historical look at how women have suffered as patients at the hands of Western medicine, from ancient Greece to present. Peppered with historical case studies and the author's own heart-wrenching journey to a lupus diagnosis, the voices of women rise up through the narrative to be heard where they are so frequently suppressed. Cleghorn's dry humor was much appreciated throughout this journey to balance the horrific nature of the trends and stories she shares. I found the ancient history amusing, with the Greek concept of "the wandering womb" especially hilarious. But the lived realities of these experiences are far from funny. Seeing medical knowledge peeled back to reveal the insidious tentacles of patriarchy creeping through everything was somehow both liberating and disheartening. Women have survived some horrible shit, sometimes with no help from doctors, and others in spite of the very medical attention meant to cure their ills. Of the many topics covered, here are just a few that will stay with me:  • hysteria, hormones, and the other excuses to dismiss women's pain altogether or root it in psychology  • abortion, forced sterilization, birth control, eugenics, and all the ways women's reproduction is more valued than her own well-being and decided by the medical apparatus  • the way medical knowledge has been accrued without female input or consent in so many cases -- I was especially horrified by accounts of research done on enslaved Black American women and the more recent trials of The Pill on Puerto Rican women without knowledge of the risks  • the lack of knowledge, empathy, and support for women with chronic pain conditions This is far from a complete history, but I don't think that's feasible for one book, anyway. It's largely focused on the US and UK, but I was relieved that the author addresses race, class, and gender identity as intersectional factors in women's health. I will carry these thoughts into my own experiences as a patient, and I want to learn even more about this topic and advocacy.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Yolanda Sfetsos

    Just like The Menopause Manifesto, this is a book that I just had to get my hands on. Also, the cover is gorgeous. As a girl who grew up to become a woman, I'm no stranger to being dismissed or harassed because of my gender. I've also experienced plenty of reactions from male doctors who either made me feel like I was complaining about nothing, overdoing it, or made it sound like every symptom in the world was somehow closely tied to my gender and weight. So, of course this book instantly caught Just like The Menopause Manifesto, this is a book that I just had to get my hands on. Also, the cover is gorgeous. As a girl who grew up to become a woman, I'm no stranger to being dismissed or harassed because of my gender. I've also experienced plenty of reactions from male doctors who either made me feel like I was complaining about nothing, overdoing it, or made it sound like every symptom in the world was somehow closely tied to my gender and weight. So, of course this book instantly caught my attention. Not just because I'm very interested in this subject, but because I can so relate to the concept of women's health being dismissed. In this nice and thick book, Elinor Cleghorn lays out the many ways women's health issues are often ignored or misdiagnosed because not enough time and effort is devoted to research. She also shares her own experience after becoming an unwell woman. I love how much history is packed into the book. Every page is full of handy information about everything. Some, I already knew about, but there's so much more that I didn't. I mean, it starts all the way back in Ancient Greece before covering every century between then and now. There's a LOT of history and info packed within these pages, and I enjoyed reading about all of it. Unwell Women: A Journey Through Medicine And Myth in a Man-Made World is an awesome book packed full of medical history that focuses on women. I found this refreshing, intriguing, and very interesting. This is another one of those books every woman should have on their bookshelf. Thank you Hachette Australia for sending me a copy!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Anne

    Fascinating but completely enraging. An excellent companion to "Invisible Women" by Caroline Criado-Perez. I am going to give this an extremely strong content warning for readers as the primary materials quoted include graphic and disturbing descriptions of medical interventions performed on women without their consent or with any acknowledgement of pain or trauma (as in not believing women feel physical pain). There is also language comparing women, particularly racialized and working class wom Fascinating but completely enraging. An excellent companion to "Invisible Women" by Caroline Criado-Perez. I am going to give this an extremely strong content warning for readers as the primary materials quoted include graphic and disturbing descriptions of medical interventions performed on women without their consent or with any acknowledgement of pain or trauma (as in not believing women feel physical pain). There is also language comparing women, particularly racialized and working class women to animals and treatment reflecting this.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Kayleigh Brooks

    A really detailed and interesting look at the treatment of women during the history of medicine in the Western world. Particularly of interest was the "wondering uterus" theories of the ancient Greeks, the pushing out and persecution of women practising medicine and then being accused of witchcraft and the in depth analysis through time of hysteria. I really liked how each part was presented and that it was acknowledged when a doctor or activist had also held troublesome beliefs. This took me long A really detailed and interesting look at the treatment of women during the history of medicine in the Western world. Particularly of interest was the "wondering uterus" theories of the ancient Greeks, the pushing out and persecution of women practising medicine and then being accused of witchcraft and the in depth analysis through time of hysteria. I really liked how each part was presented and that it was acknowledged when a doctor or activist had also held troublesome beliefs. This took me longer than average to read but I feel like that's because there was so much to take in! Definitely recommend this, might have to get my hands on a paper copy!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Candice L. Buchanan

    I came at this book as a genealogist wanting to better understand the ordeal of a particular female ancestor who received a gendered diagnosis in the 1800s. In the end, I now feel closer to all of the women in my family tree, from myself right on back the branches, because I have such a better understanding of what this part of their lives was like and how their generations contributed to what we know today. This book was so informative, well researched, and well written. It’s a talent to explai I came at this book as a genealogist wanting to better understand the ordeal of a particular female ancestor who received a gendered diagnosis in the 1800s. In the end, I now feel closer to all of the women in my family tree, from myself right on back the branches, because I have such a better understanding of what this part of their lives was like and how their generations contributed to what we know today. This book was so informative, well researched, and well written. It’s a talent to explain so much medical and scientific information in such an understandable and entertaining way. At times the outrageous scenarios made me furious and frustrated, but the history is so important to understand. We need to know what past and present generations of women have endured so that we recognize why we need to pay attention and keep up the fight for better health care and understanding for everyone.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Carol Turner

    If you haven't read Unwell Women, put it on your list. Elinor Cleghorn has written a eminently readable, well-researched up to the minute history of medicine and women. While I can remember a great deal of the last 70 or so years, and had heard of much of the historical information, I found many new and intriguing facts. If you haven't read Unwell Women, put it on your list. Elinor Cleghorn has written a eminently readable, well-researched up to the minute history of medicine and women. While I can remember a great deal of the last 70 or so years, and had heard of much of the historical information, I found many new and intriguing facts.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Esme

    The BEST nonfiction book I have read this year and ranks incredibly highly on the all time list. Will be gifted to all the women in my life. Infuriating and thought provoking but written in a way it feels like an older mentor is letting you in on secrets over a coffee.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Maria

    This book highlights and challenges a lot of commonly-held assumptions about women's health by showing their historical roots. If you are a women, it will infuriate you. This book highlights and challenges a lot of commonly-held assumptions about women's health by showing their historical roots. If you are a women, it will infuriate you.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Natalie

    If you are a uterus owner, or know one, this is a must-read. The weaponizing of women’s bodies is laid bare in this book. Well-researched and fascinating from start to end!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Lauren

    “This book delves into the ways that androcentric medicine has studied, assessed, and defined the biological and anatomical conditions labeled ‘female.’” In Unwell Women, Elinor Cleghorn compiles and exposes the history of women’s medicine. Beginning with Hippocrates and stretching to the present, this book presents countless stories of women suffering at the hands of male doctors. Whether the theories those doctors espoused are laugh-out-loud ridiculous or downright horrifying, they are importan “This book delves into the ways that androcentric medicine has studied, assessed, and defined the biological and anatomical conditions labeled ‘female.’” In Unwell Women, Elinor Cleghorn compiles and exposes the history of women’s medicine. Beginning with Hippocrates and stretching to the present, this book presents countless stories of women suffering at the hands of male doctors. Whether the theories those doctors espoused are laugh-out-loud ridiculous or downright horrifying, they are important to read. “For the uterus does not issue forth like an animal from a lair.” You wouldn’t think it possible for a medical male to believe that an internal organ could move about on its own, but believe it they did. “Hysteria” is not a new word in our vocabulary, but how many individuals know that it refers to a “disease” that women were diagnosed with when doctors thought that their suffering was caused by a wandering womb? It’s almost too absurd to bear, but women had to face this kind of infantile “medicine” for hundreds of years, all the while undergoing insane and dehumanizing treatments for their “illness”. “An unfulfilled, unemployed uterus could move out of place, wreaking havoc on the organs it reached.” The fact that women’s reproductive rights have been at issue...forever, essentially, boggles the mind. Cleghorn uses so many sources to show just how far this fight reaches, how women have always been forced to shoulder the responsibility of furthering the species, and how every part of that “duty” has invaded society. I had never before questioned why I, a cis woman, had to receive yearly STD screening. I always assumed it was strictly for my own health. And it is for my own health, and my partners of course, but the history of female STD screenings goes back to premarital laws requiring women to receive such tests before marriage. To protect her potential husband from disease and her potential children from birth defects. And today, the CDC recommends that women, gay men, and those who engage in risky sex should receive yearly STD testing. Heterosexual men are not included in that list. Women are still expected to undergo uncomfortable tests—sure, sure, for our own health—while het men are allowed to volunteer. “If a woman ever did become a genius, she would ‘no longer be a woman in the true biological sense of the word.’” Of the many parts of this book that made me want to scream and rage, the recounting of untold years’ worth of beliefs that women were physically incapable of being anything more than a mother challenged me. I have to applaud Cleghorn and the women she quotes for tackling such asinine thoughts, for I find it difficult to explain my incredulity. Incredulity is a remarkably apt word for my overall response to this book. It is a sign of Cleghorn’s writing that I reacted so strongly to the histories she tells. I feel as though my mind has been turned sideways, enabling me to view the world from a whole new perspective. One that sees and recognizes the ages old sexism that is pervasive even today. It is institutionalized, it comes from the mouths of people who took what their parents and their parents’ parents told them and internalized it until they can’t even recognize the sheer insanity of their beliefs. It feels inescapable. But I am not without hope. The progress that has been made thanks to so many incredible women, detailed in this book by Cleghorn, helps me to see a possible future. One where women don’t suffer helplessly. One where women aren’t crushed under the expectations of society. As Cleghorn says, “women are not only victims of male-dominated medical orthodoxy; they are also powerful, courageous, and sometimes contentious agents of hope and change.”

  25. 4 out of 5

    Christy

    This book is a powerful history of how women’s health and women’s bodies have been medicalized, demonized, controlled, or ignored throughout western history, starting with Greek philosophers, to the witch hunts of the 1400’s and 1500’s, to lobotomies in the 1950’s for any number of “unexplained” maladies to the present day. The author includes her own experience with lupus and the seven years it took her to get a diagnosis, as well as the particularly harmful effects of medical practices and pre This book is a powerful history of how women’s health and women’s bodies have been medicalized, demonized, controlled, or ignored throughout western history, starting with Greek philosophers, to the witch hunts of the 1400’s and 1500’s, to lobotomies in the 1950’s for any number of “unexplained” maladies to the present day. The author includes her own experience with lupus and the seven years it took her to get a diagnosis, as well as the particularly harmful effects of medical practices and prejudices on Black women, other women of color, and women not fitting the strict gender binary imposed by mostly male doctors. She talks about the ways women have been excluded from research studies and drug trials, the horrific experimentation done on Black and Puerto Rican women in the development of modern gynecology and birth control, and the way the AIDS crisis, already horribly handled because of prejudice against gay men, was made even worse by the medical profession’s treatment of it as solely a cis male disease. From the wandering womb theory to the common belief that women’s pain was mostly in their heads to the fact that for most of western history women’s health was taken seriously solely with respect to reproduction, this book is at times infuriating to read, but it also includes positive moves forward. The author’s concluding chapter is called “Believe Us.” This book should lead to twenty other books, delving more deeply into the specific histories of so many of these practices and problems. This book is dense but not hard to follow — I don’t feel like it was written for academics. A great read.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Colin Thomas

    Deeply fascinating book. Deeply frustrating book. Deeply illuminating book.

  27. 5 out of 5

    What Fern Reads

    UNWELL WOMEN highlights how medicine has failed women. There is an exploration of witch trials, of how hysteria was used for difficult-to-diagnosis disorders and the shifting understanding of hormones, menstruation, menopause, and conditions like endometriosis. My thoughts on this are short and sweet. Interesting, informative, shocking, and shameful. I’ve always known that women’s bodies were treated as an anomaly but having myself suffered from PCOS and endometriosis, it was eye opening to read UNWELL WOMEN highlights how medicine has failed women. There is an exploration of witch trials, of how hysteria was used for difficult-to-diagnosis disorders and the shifting understanding of hormones, menstruation, menopause, and conditions like endometriosis. My thoughts on this are short and sweet. Interesting, informative, shocking, and shameful. I’ve always known that women’s bodies were treated as an anomaly but having myself suffered from PCOS and endometriosis, it was eye opening to read of the history of women’s health. This is a brilliantly well researched piece and I’d encourage anyone interested in feminist history and women’s health to take a look.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Amy Whitehouse

    Must-read. So, so important but also funny and courageous. There wasn’t a single chapter when I didn’t do a WTF?!?!?! about what some women have been forced to endure historically by the medical establishment.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Chantal Lyons

    'Unwell Women' is nothing if not thorough. The amount of research Cleghorn must have done for it is surely immense, and I'm in awe. We begin as far back as Ancient Greece, and linger in the Medieval era as we encounter a procession of twisted religious views on women's bodies and minds and how these fuelled witch hunts. Moving forwards into the 1800s/early 1900s, much of the story shifts to the U.S. and medical "progress" which often came at the cost of causing terrible harm to women's bodies, i 'Unwell Women' is nothing if not thorough. The amount of research Cleghorn must have done for it is surely immense, and I'm in awe. We begin as far back as Ancient Greece, and linger in the Medieval era as we encounter a procession of twisted religious views on women's bodies and minds and how these fuelled witch hunts. Moving forwards into the 1800s/early 1900s, much of the story shifts to the U.S. and medical "progress" which often came at the cost of causing terrible harm to women's bodies, in particular those of Black women. I actually wasn't able to read all of the book - I found the sheer quantity and weight of hatred against women in these pages overwhelming, and I do wonder if some sections could have been contracted without losing any of the message (the book is nearly 500 pages long). I was also disappointed that so little time was spent in the present day; Cleghorn recounts her awful and not uncommon experience of suffering from Lupus and finally getting a diagnosis, but in total, the "modern day" elements make up about 5% or so of the book. I am a sufferer of axial spondyloarthritis, a type of rheumatoid arthritis, and having waited longer for a diagnosis than I should have, I wanted to read more about what is happening in medicine right now (in the vein of 'Invisible Women'). Still, I can only commend Cleghorn for the detail of the book and her academic rigour. This is an epic of vital history. (With thanks to Orion and NetGalley for this ebook in exchange for an honest review)

  30. 5 out of 5

    gemsbooknook Geramie Kate Barker

    ”We are taught that medicine is the art of solving our body’s mysteries. And as a science, we expect medicine to uphold the principles of evidence and impartiality. We want our doctors to listen to us and care for us as people, but we also need their assessments of our pain and fevers, aches and exhaustion to be free of any prejudice about who we are, our gender, or the colour of our skin. But medicine carries the burden of its own troubling history. The history of medicine, of illness, is a his ”We are taught that medicine is the art of solving our body’s mysteries. And as a science, we expect medicine to uphold the principles of evidence and impartiality. We want our doctors to listen to us and care for us as people, but we also need their assessments of our pain and fevers, aches and exhaustion to be free of any prejudice about who we are, our gender, or the colour of our skin. But medicine carries the burden of its own troubling history. The history of medicine, of illness, is a history of people, of their bodies and their lives, not just physicians, surgeons, clinicians and researchers. And medical progress has always reflected the realities of a changing world, and the meanings of being human.’ In Unwell Women Elinor Cleghorn unpacks the roots of the perpetual misunderstanding, mystification and misdiagnosis of women’s bodies, and traces the journey from the ‘wandering womb’ of ancient Greece, the rise of witch trials in Medieval Europe, through the dawn of Hysteria, to modern day understandings of autoimmune diseases, the menopause and conditions like endometriosis. Packed with character studies of women who have suffered, challenged and rewritten medical orthodoxy – and drawing on her own experience of un-diagnosed Lupus disease – this is a ground-breaking and timely expose of the medical world and woman’s place within it.’ This book was amazing. I will freely admit that I had some doubts going into this book. I was afraid that it was going to be too scientific and historic; in other words… boring. I was very pleased to find that not only was this book far from boring, but it was also easy to read. I was captivated by this book from the first page, and I felt compelled to keep on reading. I went through a roller coaster of reactions while reading this book and finished it feeling passionate to learn more. I found myself initially laughing at some of the ridiculous beliefs about women from history before I realized that these beliefs were damaging and their legacy is still being felt today. Elinor Cleghorn has done a fabulous job with this fantastic book. It was well researched, enlightening, and utterly current. The history of Unwell Women is something that every woman should be aware of and unfortunately, I don’t think they are. Until reading this book I was woefully ignorant about the way women were treated just for being women. This is one of those books that genuinely makes you think and then stays without long after you have finished reading it. Hopefully, this book finds its way into the hands of women around the world. Unwell Women by Elinor Cleghorn is a must-read for all women. Geramie Kate Barker gemsbooknook.wordpress.com

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

hi
Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.