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Dream Girl

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Following up on her acclaimed and wildly successful New York Times bestseller Lady in the Lake, Laura Lippman returns with a dark, complex tale of psychological suspense with echoes of Misery involving a novelist, incapacitated by injury, who is plagued by mysterious phone calls. After being injured in a freak accident, novelist Gerry Andersen lies in a hospital bed in his Following up on her acclaimed and wildly successful New York Times bestseller Lady in the Lake, Laura Lippman returns with a dark, complex tale of psychological suspense with echoes of Misery involving a novelist, incapacitated by injury, who is plagued by mysterious phone calls. After being injured in a freak accident, novelist Gerry Andersen lies in a hospital bed in his glamorous but sterile apartment, isolated from the busy world he can see through his windows, utterly dependent on two women he barely knows: his young assistant and a night nurse whose competency he questions. But Gerry is also beginning to question his own competency. As he moves in and out of dreamlike memories and seemingly random appearances of a persistent ex-girlfriend at his bedside, he fears he may be losing his grip on reality, much like his mother who recently passed away from dementia. Most distressing, he believes he’s being plagued by strange telephone calls, in which a woman claiming to be the titular character of his hit novel Dream Girl swears she will be coming to see him soon. The character is completely fictitious, but no one has ever believed Gerry when he makes that claim. Is he the victim of a cruel prank—or is he actually losing his mind★ There is no record of the calls according to the log on his phone. Could there be someone he has wronged★ Is someone coming to do him harm as he lies helplessly in bed★ Then comes the morning he wakes up next to a dead body—and realizes his nightmare is just beginning...


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Following up on her acclaimed and wildly successful New York Times bestseller Lady in the Lake, Laura Lippman returns with a dark, complex tale of psychological suspense with echoes of Misery involving a novelist, incapacitated by injury, who is plagued by mysterious phone calls. After being injured in a freak accident, novelist Gerry Andersen lies in a hospital bed in his Following up on her acclaimed and wildly successful New York Times bestseller Lady in the Lake, Laura Lippman returns with a dark, complex tale of psychological suspense with echoes of Misery involving a novelist, incapacitated by injury, who is plagued by mysterious phone calls. After being injured in a freak accident, novelist Gerry Andersen lies in a hospital bed in his glamorous but sterile apartment, isolated from the busy world he can see through his windows, utterly dependent on two women he barely knows: his young assistant and a night nurse whose competency he questions. But Gerry is also beginning to question his own competency. As he moves in and out of dreamlike memories and seemingly random appearances of a persistent ex-girlfriend at his bedside, he fears he may be losing his grip on reality, much like his mother who recently passed away from dementia. Most distressing, he believes he’s being plagued by strange telephone calls, in which a woman claiming to be the titular character of his hit novel Dream Girl swears she will be coming to see him soon. The character is completely fictitious, but no one has ever believed Gerry when he makes that claim. Is he the victim of a cruel prank—or is he actually losing his mind★ There is no record of the calls according to the log on his phone. Could there be someone he has wronged★ Is someone coming to do him harm as he lies helplessly in bed★ Then comes the morning he wakes up next to a dead body—and realizes his nightmare is just beginning...

30 review for Dream Girl

  1. 4 out of 5

    JanB

    What sly wicked fun this was! Novelist Gerry Anderson has a double tear in his quadricep and is bound to his bed in his beautiful new apartment in Baltimore. Having recently moved from NYC to be near his mother, who has since passed away from Alzheimer’s, he knows no one and must depend on his recently hired assistant and night nurse for everything. Gerry begins to receive vaguely threatening telephone calls from a woman claiming to be Aubrey, the name of the character in his bestselling novel, Dr What sly wicked fun this was! Novelist Gerry Anderson has a double tear in his quadricep and is bound to his bed in his beautiful new apartment in Baltimore. Having recently moved from NYC to be near his mother, who has since passed away from Alzheimer’s, he knows no one and must depend on his recently hired assistant and night nurse for everything. Gerry begins to receive vaguely threatening telephone calls from a woman claiming to be Aubrey, the name of the character in his bestselling novel, Dream Girl. Aubrey claims she exists and he has done her wrong. Although it‘s a matter of speculation in the literary world, Gerry claims Aubrey is completely fictitious. On heavy doses of pain medication and Ambien is he experiencing drug-induced delusions? Is he the victim of a prank? Is he suffering from dementia like his mother? The latter seems likely as there is no record of the calls that become increasingly threatening. As the danger escalates, he lies helpless as a baby in his bed. If this is really happening could there be a woman he has wronged? No. His conscience is clear. Well…Clearish. If only the culture wasn’t moving so fast. Jokes that were fine a few years ago are now deemed offensive. And all of the many women he slept with practically demanded it. HE was the victim here, not them. Of course he’s blameless. Right? Gerry’s thoughts are hilarious and made me laugh out loud more than once. Other times…well, as we move back in time to certain incidents in his life we begin to suspect Gerry may lack self-awareness. This was an uncorrected ARC so keep that in mind, but some of my favorite lines: Regarding the tablet cover that belongs to his non-reading, tv watching assistant: “the case is covered with a pattern featuring cats doing human things. Cooking, riding bicycles, knitting. Reading. So cats read, but she doesn’t.” -“It is a smart phone. It is smarter than anyone who works for him, that’s for sure.” -“Yet soft, tactical lies, so-called white lies—is it okay to call them white or is that now racist?” -“She has joined a book club in the building, although it seems like more of a drinking club to Gerry.” -“…an all-black outfit with a “statement” necklace, only what is the statement? “Hello, I am confident enough to wear this very large, ugly necklace.” -“although she never eats, she does her not-eating in the very best restaurants, wearing beautiful clothes.” -“She always insisted that she had not had “work” done, a turn of phrase that amuses Gerry, as it implies that tightening and plumping the body is a job in a way that other surgery is not. No one speaks of heart work.” The author in the epilogue considers this her first work of horror inspired in part by a few of her favorite novelists. Certainly, as the events transpire the story gets very dark indeed but I would call it more of a literary thriller. Some things that occur are horrific but they happen off the page. I absolutely loved it. The writing is sharp and smart and the slow build-up of tension and suspense was pitch perfect. I loved Gerry’s witty observations, I loved the flashbacks that give us a clearer picture of who he really was, I loved the references to book titles, authors, and movies, the publishing world and academia, and I loved the satirical humor. And the ending….well, it was a fitting end! Unputdownable and highly recommended! “In a world that was speeding up, novelists were obligated to make people slow down." So true, but this was such a page-turner it was difficult to slow down. • I received a digital copy of the book via NetGalley. All opinions are my own • Pub date 6/22/21 by William Morrow

  2. 4 out of 5

    Meredith

    “Anyone could be a novelist.” Dream Girl is a slow-burn psychological thriller about a famous author who believes that a character from his fictional novel is out for revenge. Is he losing his mind, or is there something more sinister at play? Meet Gerry-acclaimed novelist, divorcee, and all-around asshole. Gerry recently moved from New York City to his hometown of Baltimore to be near his dying mother. Living alone in a million-dollar condo, Gerry begins reminiscing on his life: his novels, th “Anyone could be a novelist.” Dream Girl is a slow-burn psychological thriller about a famous author who believes that a character from his fictional novel is out for revenge. Is he losing his mind, or is there something more sinister at play? Meet Gerry-acclaimed novelist, divorcee, and all-around asshole. Gerry recently moved from New York City to his hometown of Baltimore to be near his dying mother. Living alone in a million-dollar condo, Gerry begins reminiscing on his life: his novels, the courses he taught, his former students, his childhood, his friendships, his various wives, romantic relationships, and sexual encounters. When he receives a letter from one of his fictional characters, Gerry has an accident leaving him unable to walk. Now dependent on his assistant and night nurse, Gerry soon finds himself entwined in a strange series of events, leading to a very twisted ending. Told almost primarily from Gerry’s point of view, the reader develops an intimate relationship with Gerry. The non-linear timeline switches back and forth between the past and the present, allowing the reader to view the defining moments in Gerry’s life. Since these events are not told in order, how they fit together is a little puzzling, but they all fit in the end. This is a slow-paced read, and there isn’t much action. Being trapped in Gerry's mind is not always pleasant. Gerry is vile, but he has a few redeeming qualities. He comes off as very flawed, but he is also very human. His character felt quite realistic. He is intelligent but isn’t very good at reading people, especially women. Ironically, Gerry relishes the memories of his good moments, especially when they concern the women in his life. I found the premise clever, and I loved the ending; however, at times, I struggled due to my disgust over Gerry’s actions. Readers are going to love or hate this book due to the slow pace and Gerry’s character. There were times when I was grappling between love and hate, but there is something so intriguing about Gerry’s story that kept me coming back for more. In the end, Dream Girl was a win for me. I received an ARC of this book from NetGalley and the publisher in exchange for an honest review.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Nilufer Ozmekik

    Bad news my friends! It seems like semi- unpopular reviewer stuck in the book traffic! There are so many good things I can tell for this book and there are also a few things I didn’t quite enjoy. When I sum up my pros and cons, they seem like equal. I can give this book 3.25 stars but it is still a little under my expectations when I compare the other books of the author with this! I absolutely like the idea of the author to be bold enough to try different genre, choosing to write horror. But ac Bad news my friends! It seems like semi- unpopular reviewer stuck in the book traffic! There are so many good things I can tell for this book and there are also a few things I didn’t quite enjoy. When I sum up my pros and cons, they seem like equal. I can give this book 3.25 stars but it is still a little under my expectations when I compare the other books of the author with this! I absolutely like the idea of the author to be bold enough to try different genre, choosing to write horror. But actually this book isn’t a horror! It’s mostly slow burn psychological thriller inspired by Misery and Gaslighting ( maybe just a little Rear Window with #metoomovement vibes) But the similarities with Misery was a little too much ( especially at the second half of the book) The premise was the best thing I truly enjoyed about the book: 61 years old bedridden bestseller author of famous Dream Girl, Gerry Andersen living at his gorgeous Baltimore apartment located at 25th stairs ( even writing about it makes me suffer from vertigo) A designated strange nurse and his assistant help him to get through his caring and daily errands. Instead of his demanding ex Margot’s uninvited intrusions, his days seem uneventful till strange things start happening like a letter disappears as soon as he sees addressed to the place he used at his dream girl books and later the fiction character he created starts calling him to tell people will learn she’s for real and she is demanding his share to use her identity in his books. Yes, his dream girl Aubrey which still funds him at his rainy days seem like finding a way to come to life for an ulterior motive. Interestingly there is no trace of the phone calls. And his drug induced state makes him think he might have dreamed the entire situation. Could the woman on the phone be the product of his imagination or could he start showing symptoms of amnesia just like his mother has endured till she’s dead? I’m sold! This is good storyline but I have a few problems about the execution starting with rotation between back and forth. The imminent time jumps were never problematic for me necessarily if they gave enough clues to complete the entire puzzle but I felt like some of the flashbacks were not related to the main story. Don’t get me wrong: the short and well developed chapters were interesting but it also distracted the slow burn high tension about mysterious woman story and finding out possibilities about her identity. I also never liked or cared about Gerry a little bit. The women in his life were far more interesting characters than him including three ex wives and his ultra irritating, tenacious ex Margot. I find him so selfish, so aimless, so flat and hardly connectable. I also found the ending a little semi satisfying. It was fair but it seems like there are still some unfinished things about the entire story. It left me puzzled. I absolutely couldn’t decide how made me felt but I’m so sure:,I wasn’t completely happy with the result. It was still well written story with extremely great potential but it isn’t completely my cup of Chardonnay. I think I enjoyed Tess Monaghan series so much more. I couldn’t get the same taste from that story! Special thanks to NetGalley and Faber and Faber Ltd for sharing this digital reviewer copy with me in exchange my honest thoughts.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Holly B

    A wild ride, a runaway train that spun around in every direction until .... THUD The suspense and satire along the way kept me riveted. Gerry's thoughts and actions were truly riotous. Gerry is a famous novelist laid up in bed while he recovers from a fall. He is asleep more than he's awake. He is often not quite asleep and not quite awake. His nurse, Aileen (enter Drama!) looms over him serving pills with his dinner. She is a "cheerful Lady Macbeth, humming as she works." He wonders if he A wild ride, a runaway train that spun around in every direction until .... THUD The suspense and satire along the way kept me riveted. Gerry's thoughts and actions were truly riotous. Gerry is a famous novelist laid up in bed while he recovers from a fall. He is asleep more than he's awake. He is often not quite asleep and not quite awake. His nurse, Aileen (enter Drama!) looms over him serving pills with his dinner. She is a "cheerful Lady Macbeth, humming as she works." He wonders if he is having delusions or hallucinations. A mystery caller, missing letters , a fictional tweeter. Gerry asks repeatedly, "Do I know you, who are you?" This train was off the rails, someone truly does steal the show and I loved every minute of reading about it! Thanks to NG/ and the publishers for my early review copy. HIGHLY RECOMMEND OUT JUNE 22, 2021

  5. 4 out of 5

    Michael David

    HAPPY PUBLICATION DAY! Gerry Andersen is a novelist whose best-selling novel, Dream Girl, continues to provide him with funds. He’s written other books since then, but they haven’t quite achieved the same level of acclaim. After a freak accident, Gerry finds himself confined to a hospital bed in his beautiful 25th floor apartment. While trying to heal and write a new novel in between visits from his assistant and night nurse, Gerry starts receiving disturbing phone calls from “Aubrey”, the main c HAPPY PUBLICATION DAY! Gerry Andersen is a novelist whose best-selling novel, Dream Girl, continues to provide him with funds. He’s written other books since then, but they haven’t quite achieved the same level of acclaim. After a freak accident, Gerry finds himself confined to a hospital bed in his beautiful 25th floor apartment. While trying to heal and write a new novel in between visits from his assistant and night nurse, Gerry starts receiving disturbing phone calls from “Aubrey”, the main character in Dream Girl. How is that possible? Aubrey is a character he completely made up. Could the source be one of his ex-wives, playing tricks on him? Are the calls really happening? Could he be imagining them in his medicinal haze? The thought that kept recurring in my head while reading this book was: “This is so bizarre.” It truly is. The timeline jumps all over the place, through several decades. It was a bit jarring at first. Once I got used to it and picked up what was being thrown down, I sat back and enjoyed the ride. This is a psychological thriller with many moving pieces and nuanced scenes that don’t seem like they will connect to Gerry’s current predicament, but they do...most of them, at least. Gerry may be an unreliable narrator, and it’s interesting to see how he perceives himself with what we learn about him in his past. With flavors of Misery and the #MeToo Movement, there is no shortage of suspects or possible scenarios. It takes a wicked and unexpectedly delicious turn towards the end. Although this took me awhile to get into, I enjoyed it overall. This is the second Laura Lippman book I’ve read, and I’m looking forward to more. 3.5 stars. Thank you to William Morrow and NetGalley for an ARC in exchange for an honest review. This book is set to be published on 6/22/21. Review also posted at: https://bonkersforthebooks.wordpress.com

  6. 4 out of 5

    Terrie Robinson

    "Dream Girl" by Laura Lippman is definitely Psychological-Thriller not Horror! Author Gerry Anderson's book 'Dream Girl' is his best-seller that still provides him with substantial royalties. Aubrey, the novel's main character, remains a topic of interest. Why does everyone want to know who Gerry designed this character after? She's just a character! Poor Gerry. He's had a terrible, debilitating accident and is confined to a hospital bed in his 25th floor luxury apartment. Thank goodness he has h "Dream Girl" by Laura Lippman is definitely Psychological-Thriller not Horror! Author Gerry Anderson's book 'Dream Girl' is his best-seller that still provides him with substantial royalties. Aubrey, the novel's main character, remains a topic of interest. Why does everyone want to know who Gerry designed this character after? She's just a character! Poor Gerry. He's had a terrible, debilitating accident and is confined to a hospital bed in his 25th floor luxury apartment. Thank goodness he has his assistant, Victoria to help him during the day and nurse, Aileen to help him at night. Where would Gerry be without all the women in his life? His pretty and doting mother, his three ex-wives, his ex-girlfriend, Margo and now Victoria and Aileen. There have been more women in his life. Many more. Gerry was good to all of them. Ask him. That's what he'll tell you. That's what he believes! Why is Aubrey calling Gerry in the middle of the night? He knows she's a character in 'Dream Girl'. She's not real. So who's calling him? Is he dreaming? Where is that unopened envelope with Aubrey's address on it? Are the pain medications causing foggy dreams? Is he hallucinating? Or does he have dementia like his mother? Poor Blurry Gerry... This is the first book I have read from this author and she is quite the storyteller. The premise grabbed me but it proved to be a slow starter and it took a lot of effort for me to remain focused on this story in its entirety. The different timelines jumped all over making it hard to follow. So mixed up between the past and present that it felt spliced together haphazardly. I know the purpose of these snippets in time is to replicate Gerry in a state of confusion or a dream state. Honestly, I would have preferred less from the past and more focus on the present. Gerry is a hard character to like. Poor Bedridden Gerry. Despicable and disgusting Gerry. A perfect example of a character you love to hate! But, I had trouble connecting with any of the characters in this book. So Gerry gets all my love! Admittedly, I am not a fan of this genre which is most likely why this story did not engage me. I do recommend this book to those who do enjoy reading Thriller & Suspense genres. I will also read this author again as her following is devoted & substantial for a reason! Thank you to NetGalley, Farber and Farber, Ltd. and Laura Lippman for an ARC of this book. It has been my pleasure to give my honest and voluntary review.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Michelle

    Gerry Andersen is a successful novelist and all around good guy. He came from a philandering father and vowed never to be like him. This is why he always treats his woman with the upmost respect. Just ask his first wife, or his second wife, or his third wife. They would all tell you what a swell guy he is. A shame he fell down the stairs of his new condo leaving him helpless and bedridden. His assistant Victoria spends her days with him and he hires a night nurse, Aileen, to assist him through t Gerry Andersen is a successful novelist and all around good guy. He came from a philandering father and vowed never to be like him. This is why he always treats his woman with the upmost respect. Just ask his first wife, or his second wife, or his third wife. They would all tell you what a swell guy he is. A shame he fell down the stairs of his new condo leaving him helpless and bedridden. His assistant Victoria spends her days with him and he hires a night nurse, Aileen, to assist him through the evening. He begins receiving mysterious phone calls in the night from, Aubrey. That can't be right?!?! Aubrey is a fictional character in his book. Is he losing his mind to Alzheimer's like his mother succumbed to or is he hallucinating on all the pain and sleep meds he's taking? You'll have to read this to find out. Is Jerry absolutely despicable? Yes! Are his musings hilarious? Yes! What a hoot this guy is. I love to hate characters and Lippman did a fine job in his characterization. I also found the book to be quite clever, especially in the reveal, and the ending satisfied me. So I am late to the Lippman party, this book being my first, but I am very much looking forward to her backlist of which there are many to choose from. 4 stars! Thank you to NetGalley and Faber and Faber Ltd form my copy.

  8. 5 out of 5

    preoccupiedbybooks

    Now available! A slow moving thriller with an intriguing plot Gerry, a famous author is injured and confined to his bed, only seeing his assistant and his night nurse. As he hovers between consciousness and unconsciousness, woozy from the drugs, he begin to get visits from an ex girlfriend, and most disturbingly, letters and phone calls from Aubrey; the main character from his bestselling book 'Dream Girl.' Is he having hallucinations, is someone playing a trick, or is there something more siniste Now available! A slow moving thriller with an intriguing plot Gerry, a famous author is injured and confined to his bed, only seeing his assistant and his night nurse. As he hovers between consciousness and unconsciousness, woozy from the drugs, he begin to get visits from an ex girlfriend, and most disturbingly, letters and phone calls from Aubrey; the main character from his bestselling book 'Dream Girl.' Is he having hallucinations, is someone playing a trick, or is there something more sinister going on? Oof it took me until at least 30% to get into this story, it was quite slow, and Gerry the main character was really unlikeable! He was a selfish, smug, sexist arse, who couldn't possibly think of anyone who would wish him harm, despite leaving a trail of broken hearts behind him! A privileged and unreliable narrator, Gerry was vile, and it wasn't nice being stuck in his head. There are a lot of time jumps over several decades, which took some getting used to, and the writing had a weird, dreamlike quality to it, which was purposeful, since Gerry was often asleep, or on medication. The time jumps could be quite jarring, and the flashbacks slowed the story down for me, I didn't quite see the purpose, since they didn't really flesh out Gerry's character, or make me sympathise with him? If you stick with Dream Girl though, it definitely picks up, and provides shocks and twists, and I did like the ending, it felt...satisfying! The women from Gerry's life were way more interesting than the man himself, I didn't really care about him🤷‍♀️ I did enjoy parts of this book, particularly in the second half, and it did have the potential to be quite creepy, but ultimately it wasn't the horror it set out to be. Many thanks to NetGalley and Faber and Faber for the ARC, in exchange for an honest review!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Sandy *The world could end while I was reading and I would never notice*

    EXCERPT: When the phone rings in the middle of the night, that very night, and Aileen, who tends to doze, does not answer it within three rings, Gerry fumbles for the landline next to his bed, a midcentury Swedish design with a button on the bottom. His head feels cloudy, yet he is alert enough to assume the call will be from Margot, full of recriminations for being booked in business class, which means she has to fetch her own cheese plate from the snack bar. 'Hello?' 'Gerry? I'm coming to see y EXCERPT: When the phone rings in the middle of the night, that very night, and Aileen, who tends to doze, does not answer it within three rings, Gerry fumbles for the landline next to his bed, a midcentury Swedish design with a button on the bottom. His head feels cloudy, yet he is alert enough to assume the call will be from Margot, full of recriminations for being booked in business class, which means she has to fetch her own cheese plate from the snack bar. 'Hello?' 'Gerry? I'm coming to see you soon.' 'Who is this?' Because one thing he is sure of is that it's not Margot. The voice is too sweet, too high, with a hint of a Southern accent. Also too nice. 'Oh, Gerry, you're so funny. It's Aubrey, Gerry. We need to talk. About my story, about what really happened between us, that mess with your wife. I think it's time the world knows I'm a real person.' ABOUT 'DREAM GIRL': After being injured in a freak accident, novelist Gerry Andersen lies in a hospital bed in his glamorous but sterile apartment, isolated from the busy world he can see through his windows, utterly dependent on two women he barely knows: his young assistant and a night nurse whose competency he questions. But Gerry is also beginning to question his own competency. As he moves in and out of dreamlike memories and seemingly random appearances of a persistent ex-girlfriend at his bedside, he fears he may be losing his grip on reality, much like his mother who recently passed away from dementia. Most distressing, he believes he’s being plagued by strange telephone calls, in which a woman claiming to be the titular character of his hit novel Dream Girl swears she will be coming to see him soon. The character is completely fictitious, but no one has ever believed Gerry when he makes that claim. Is he the victim of a cruel prank—or is he actually losing his mind★ There is no record of the calls according to the log on his phone. Could there be someone he has wronged★ Is someone coming to do him harm as he lies helplessly in bed★ Then comes the morning he wakes up next to a dead body—and realizes his nightmare is just beginning... MY THOUGHTS: In her author's notes, Laura Lippman writes, 'This is a book about what goes on inside a writer's mind and it is, by my lights, my first work of horror.' And while I wouldn't go quite so far as to call Dream Girl a work of horror, it definitely is an enjoyable romp on the darker side. Lippman pays homage to Stephen King's 'Misery', Roth's 'Zuckerman Unbound', and Dukore's 'A Novel Called Heritage', saying that she 'wanted to further the conversations they began in her head.' I know exactly what she means. Lippman's writing is distinctive. She does a lot of the things I hate and slam other authors for doing. She waffles on in long sentences. She writes stream of consciousness. And I love it. It works - brilliantly. I read Dream Girl in twenty-four hours and Lippman has left me wanting to read Gerry Anderson's 'Dream Girl'. I want to read about Aubrey, this elusive figment of Anderson's (and therefore Lippman's) imagination - the character that nobody will believe wasn't real. Lippman's characters are extraordinary, and the cast is quite small. Women feature hugely in Gerry's life. He's been married three times, and Margot lived with him in New York for several years. He has a female assistant, Victoria, who has the annoying tic of never being able to make a declarative statement, and whose duties expand following his accident to include being his daytime carer. Aileen is employed as his somewhat incompetent and constantly knitting night nurse. Gerry doesn't appear to have friends, and there's a dearth of males in his life with the exception of his literary agent. We learn Gerry's backstory through a dual timeline that is interspersed with his 'now' story. We meet his wives and his lovers, but disappointingly learn almost nothing about the writing of his bestseller, 'Dream Girl.' Yes, I think I have an obsession with Audrey. As you may have noticed, I had a hard time putting Dream Girl down, and when I wasn't reading it, I was thinking about it. I honestly had no idea where Lippman was heading with the plot, who was behind the mystery calls, if they were even real, or merely a product of Gerry's opioid addled brain. A few people appear to have been disappointed in the ending. I loved it. It seemed strangely fitting. A little comedic. I would love to see Dream Girl made into a movie. I would definitely go to see it. ⭐⭐⭐⭐.5 #DreamGirl #NetGalley I: @lauramlippman @faberbooks T: @LauraMLippman @FaberBooks THE AUTHOR: Laura lives in Baltimore with her husband, David Simon, and their daughter. DISCLOSURE: Thank you to Faber and Faber Ltd via Netgalley for providing a digital ARC of Dream Girl by Laura Lippman for review. All opinions expressed in this review are entirely my own personal opinions. For an explanation of my rating system please refer to my Goodreads.com profile page or the about page on sandysbookaday.wordpress.com This review and others are also published on Twitter, Amazon, and my webpage https://sandysbookaday.wordpress.com/...

  10. 4 out of 5

    Liz

    I’m a big Laura Lippman fan. And Dream Girl immediately drew me in. Gerry Andersen is bed bound, the result of a fall down his stairs. So, when he starts getting letters, tweets and calls from a character in his wildly popular novel, he initially puts it down to his pain meds. Now as a Baltimore girl, who knows exactly what it means to go to Gilman, who knows Grauls, Locust Point, even Windy Valley and the ponies, reading Lippman always feels like a trip home. I even got a chuckle that Lippman h I’m a big Laura Lippman fan. And Dream Girl immediately drew me in. Gerry Andersen is bed bound, the result of a fall down his stairs. So, when he starts getting letters, tweets and calls from a character in his wildly popular novel, he initially puts it down to his pain meds. Now as a Baltimore girl, who knows exactly what it means to go to Gilman, who knows Grauls, Locust Point, even Windy Valley and the ponies, reading Lippman always feels like a trip home. I even got a chuckle that Lippman has Tess Monaghan make an appearance. Gerry and I are also of a similar age. So, despite the fact he’s a bit of an a**hole, I could relate to him. And I did enjoy his thoughts on writing and the comparisons of books to movies. Yet, at times, he felt much older than his 61 years. I would have expected his total cluelessness to be more appropriate for a man in his 70s. But my problem here was that it took forever for something meaningful to happen. It needed more oomph! to the story. Once things start to move, it does become more enjoyable. There is definitely a sort of Misery vibe to this story, which Lippman admits to in her author’s notes. And I was really curious to see how Gerry would be able to get himself out of his predicament. I will always be a huge Laura Lippman fan, but this isn’t one of her best. My thanks to netgalley and Faber & Faber for an advance copy of this book.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Susan

    Sweet Dreams Are Made of This. Who Am I to Disagree? * After shamelessly stumping for an advanced copy and being rejected on all accounts, I purchased a hardback knowing I’d love this. And such a beautiful cover too - it’ll look great in my book display. Laura Lippman has been a favorite author since reading To the Power of Three and I’ve been enamored with each book I’ve read by her. Not so much with this one. As per her usual, Ms. Lippman’s wording and composition are so far superior that I would p Sweet Dreams Are Made of This. Who Am I to Disagree? * After shamelessly stumping for an advanced copy and being rejected on all accounts, I purchased a hardback knowing I’d love this. And such a beautiful cover too - it’ll look great in my book display. Laura Lippman has been a favorite author since reading To the Power of Three and I’ve been enamored with each book I’ve read by her. Not so much with this one. As per her usual, Ms. Lippman’s wording and composition are so far superior that I would practically read her grocery list. However, I struggled with Dream Girl because of the main character and the story itself. It wasn’t my personal taste. Protagonist Gerry doesn’t play nice but he is forced to rely on two female employees as he’s recovering from surgery. Stuck in bed for several months, he’s at the whims of the duo and the quality of assistance he’ll receive. Shades of Misery, I usually avoid plots like this. The writing exquisitely captured the twilight awareness and semi-sleep of pain medication so the reader experiences the fog along with Gerry. He’s a disagreeable sort and someone I’d prefer to distance myself from but because of the writer’s expertise, I was trapped inside this awful man’s head. As he was tethered to his bed and essentially immobile, I was aware of the irony of being trapped myself. If I wanted to enjoy my favorite author’s prose, then I was fastened to Gerry and his soliloquy. What a conundrum. This is definitively a case of "It's me and not the book" and hope I will fall in love again with her future releases. Hardback copy purchased at Barnes and Noble. *Credit Eurythmics

  12. 5 out of 5

    Ceecee

    Gerry Andersen is a successful writer with Dream Girl being his magnus opus. Following an unfortunate accident he is bedridden in his Baltimore apartment until his recovery and he has hired Victoria to oversee his affairs during the day and Aileen as a night nurse. Is Gerry being haunted by a character in his book, is he suffering the beginning of dementia, is it his pain medication causing hallucinatory dreams or is someone messing with his head? I really enjoy the conundrum of trying to work o Gerry Andersen is a successful writer with Dream Girl being his magnus opus. Following an unfortunate accident he is bedridden in his Baltimore apartment until his recovery and he has hired Victoria to oversee his affairs during the day and Aileen as a night nurse. Is Gerry being haunted by a character in his book, is he suffering the beginning of dementia, is it his pain medication causing hallucinatory dreams or is someone messing with his head? I really enjoy the conundrum of trying to work out which of these, if any, is the truth. This is a sort of homage to ‘Misery’ and I really like how there is such effective use of books and films to highlight what is going on in Gerry’s life. This is a well written slow burner mix of dark incisive humour spiced with tension and suspense. It has several really good twists and at least one jaw dropper which makes you wince. The fact that for about half the book we’re inside Gerry’s head allows for a sharply focused insight into his relationships and his personality. The truth is that Gerry is not very nice, his thoughts are not always pleasant and I think it’s fair to say that he lies a long way down the misogyny spectrum. Very few of the characters are likeable but they are most certainly interesting. The ending is excellent, it’s certainly dramatic and doles out just desserts. It’s probably fair to say it’s unlikely but it is extremely visually creative. I have to admit, I like it!!! My only issue with the book is the timelines for Gerry’s thoughts are all over the place, they’re random which takes some getting used to. Conversely, it’s actually clever because it mirrors Gerry’s rambling and uncertain state of mind. In fact who looks back on their life in linear fashion, I sure don’t!! Overall, this is another book by Laura Lippman that I’ve enjoyed. I really like her wit, precision and incisiveness. With thanks to NetGalley and especially to Faber and Faber for the much appreciated arc in return for an honest review.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Brandice

    In Dream Girl author Gerry Andersen experiences an unusual accident, confining him to a hospital bed in his new Baltimore home. He barely sees anyone besides his assistant, Victoria, and his night nurse, Aileen. While recovering, Gerry begins receiving calls from Aubrey, the title character in his successful novel, Dream Girl. Gerry has always been adamant her creation was purely imaginative so who is this, and why doesn’t anyone believe him? With nothing but time, Gerry begins to question himse In Dream Girl author Gerry Andersen experiences an unusual accident, confining him to a hospital bed in his new Baltimore home. He barely sees anyone besides his assistant, Victoria, and his night nurse, Aileen. While recovering, Gerry begins receiving calls from Aubrey, the title character in his successful novel, Dream Girl. Gerry has always been adamant her creation was purely imaginative so who is this, and why doesn’t anyone believe him? With nothing but time, Gerry begins to question himself — Is he dreaming or losing his mind? One morning, Gerry wakes up to a dead body on the floor in his room, furthering compounding his questions — What is happening?! Dream Girl was mysterious, and though somewhat of a slow burn initially, I quickly flipped the pages, curious to see how things would play out. Gerry wasn’t likable, quite an arrogant author actually, with flashbacks to previous times providing more insight into his true character, but his lack of likability didn’t stop me from becoming engaged in the story. This was my first Laura Lippman book, and I believe, a bit different than her others, but it won’t be my last! Thank you to William Morrow Books and @bibliolifestyle for providing a copy of Dream Girl in exchange for an honest review.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Christina

    Laura Lippman, you’ve done it again! I loved this biting satirical mystery about an aging writer with a warped sense of self-perception and entitlement, especially where women are concerned. Many agree that Laura Lippman is one of the best writers working in the mystery genre today, and her prose really shone here. “Dream Girl” is the name of the book, and is also the name of the novel our irascible and unlikable protagonist (?) Gerry wrote back in 2001. Dream Girl was Gerry’s one shining success Laura Lippman, you’ve done it again! I loved this biting satirical mystery about an aging writer with a warped sense of self-perception and entitlement, especially where women are concerned. Many agree that Laura Lippman is one of the best writers working in the mystery genre today, and her prose really shone here. “Dream Girl” is the name of the book, and is also the name of the novel our irascible and unlikable protagonist (?) Gerry wrote back in 2001. Dream Girl was Gerry’s one shining success that made him a literary wunderkind at the time, And accordingly, Gerry appears to still be living in some version of the past, but maybe more like the 1980s, when popular male writers were treated like rock stars and revered for bad behavior. Gerry still thinks that’s how life is, as evidenced also by things like his old-timer’s proclivity for handwritten checks in lieu of EFTs and his even more ancient belief that all women are best and most fulfilled while serving him. Lippman really does a masterful job of showing how myopic Gerry is about himself. When Gerry begins to get cryptic letters from a woman in his past, he simply can’t IMAGINE who they might be from. He can’t think of any woman he’s ever wronged! Despite the fact that he has three ex-wives, some 30 “one night stands,” and numerous female students he clearly objectified. In fact, it becomes clear that Gerry objectified all women, from the “nurse” who helps him while he’s confined to bed with an injury, to his ex-girlfriend, to his former wives and students. It takes awhile for the murders to start happening, but the reader will be less shocked that Gerry about them. I’m not sure how Lippman makes this awful man so much fun to read about. But I think much is due to her deadpan wit, superior writing, and self-awareness (while Gerry has none). In addition to being a very fun read, this book also has some things to say about how Gerry’s sort of men view women and how their views have stayed static as society changes. On a deeper level, the book asks interesting questions about an author’s relationship to his or her subjects and inspirations. So I loved this book as both a feminist and a fan of fiction. The book starts off a little slow establishing characters and plot, but I didn’t mind at all because the writing was so wonderful. I think readers will find the beginning either slow or engrossing depending on their enjoyment of her writing style, particularly the satirical edge, which I loved. When I got to the fantastic end, I was extremely impressed at how Lippman was able to pull off something so clever, so symbolic, and so entertaining on its face. “Dream Girl” solidifies Laura Lippman’s place as one of our most literary modern mystery writers. I really look forward to delving more deeply into my unread books in her backlist, because this book reminded me why I love her writing so much. 4.5⭐️ Thanks to Faber and Faber, NetGalley, and the author for this wonderful ARC. ETA: I was today years old when I learned Laura Lippman is married to David Simon. How do I get invited to THAT dinner party?

  15. 4 out of 5

    Allison Faught

    3⭐️ Let me start with the good as I’m a relatively optimistic person and I like to sandwich my criticisms with positives! 👏🏼 Lippman is fantastic at storytelling and has quite the unique way with words. 👏🏼 The premise of this story was enticing. It shared elements of different stories, but was individualistic in delivery. 👏🏼 Flashbacks were easy to follow. A couple things missed it for me, but please note that there are many people who enjoyed this book so I may be an outlier and I am completely op 3⭐️ Let me start with the good as I’m a relatively optimistic person and I like to sandwich my criticisms with positives! 👏🏼 Lippman is fantastic at storytelling and has quite the unique way with words. 👏🏼 The premise of this story was enticing. It shared elements of different stories, but was individualistic in delivery. 👏🏼 Flashbacks were easy to follow. A couple things missed it for me, but please note that there are many people who enjoyed this book so I may be an outlier and I am completely open to reading more from this author!! 😊 👎🏻 There we’re A LOT of characters brought up in flashbacks that I wasn’t sure who was supposed to be important to the plot or not. 👎🏻 I felt like most flashbacks had nothing to do with the present day storyline. 👎🏻 VERY slow moving. It took me a really long time to get into the story. Nothing really ‘happens’ until about 40% of the way through the book. 👎🏻 I only finished this book this morning and already forgot most of what I read. Nothing seemed too memorable or thought provoking. A couple in-betweeners that I’m not letting affect my rating: 🤷‍♀️ There are many references that went completely over my head probably mostly due to my age. I may have enjoyed Gerry’s little rants more if I understood the pop culture remarks. 🤷‍♀️ My husband and I vacationed at my uncle’s lake house in Northern Michigan when I felt enticed to read this book. I was watching Good Morning America (1 of maybe 4 channels to choose from 🤣) while drinking my morning coffee and they were interviewing Laura Lippman about this novel. Throughout the rest of the day we did wine tasting, went sailing and had a fancy dinner. I may have unintentionally and subconsciously hyped this book up seeing as how the rest of the day was so beyond perfect. All in all, I can’t say it was a bad read by any means, but I felt it just didn’t hold my interest like I was hoping it would.

  16. 5 out of 5

    L.A.

    Dark, psychological, suspenseful, wicked, dreamlike..... Alfred Hitchcock would have loved to turn this movie into a turn of the century film. What Gaslight (1940) and Rear Window (1954) depicted with paranoid mentality and delusions, this book would have blended well with this narrator. We witness only what he sees so this book exploited my own anxieties for the main character when his fears were so vulnerable. Gerry Anderson experienced illusions induced with pain meds and ambien and questione Dark, psychological, suspenseful, wicked, dreamlike..... Alfred Hitchcock would have loved to turn this movie into a turn of the century film. What Gaslight (1940) and Rear Window (1954) depicted with paranoid mentality and delusions, this book would have blended well with this narrator. We witness only what he sees so this book exploited my own anxieties for the main character when his fears were so vulnerable. Gerry Anderson experienced illusions induced with pain meds and ambien and questioned his own state of mind. He is taken care of by his assistant Victoria and night nurse Aileen due to his incapacitated state caused by a freak accident. As a wealthy author, he is able to live in the finest high rise overlooking Baltimore after his successful book Dream Girl was written about a fictional character Aubrey. Trying to grasp reality, he receives mysterious phone calls from a lady posing as Aubrey, with no record of these calls, missing letters and cruel tweets he becomes motivated by his own personal psychotic behavior. It took me a few chapters to realize what was going on, but his dry humor and orchestration of his life over a few decades kept me entertained and laughing out loud. With the details of 3 ex-wives, former students and several female co-workers, his sexual encounters were numerous whether forbidden or welcomed.... you may find him vile and morally wicked. Getting past his flaws, I think you will find the book well-worth your time. Overall for me...Yes! Yes! and Yes! That twist at the end puts it in a different perspective. Thank you NetGalley and Harper Audio for this ARC in exchange for my honest review. I can't wait to read the book instead of listen to it.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Angie Kim

    I read this in ONE day. I meant to read 15 minutes while eating, and I never got off my reading chair. This book is pure delicious fun! MISERY meets GASLIGHT, on top of Laura Lippman's usual stellar writing, psychological insight, witty humor (laugh out loud at times), and nailbiting suspense. I loved Tess Monaghan's cameo, the real-life publishing gossip (nice naming names there, Ms. Lippman!), and the slow building of dread and horror. As much as I find comfort in my favorite authors sticking I read this in ONE day. I meant to read 15 minutes while eating, and I never got off my reading chair. This book is pure delicious fun! MISERY meets GASLIGHT, on top of Laura Lippman's usual stellar writing, psychological insight, witty humor (laugh out loud at times), and nailbiting suspense. I loved Tess Monaghan's cameo, the real-life publishing gossip (nice naming names there, Ms. Lippman!), and the slow building of dread and horror. As much as I find comfort in my favorite authors sticking to what has always worked for them, I love even more (not to mention respect and admire) when they branch out and try new things I haven't quite seen before.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Linda

    Dream girls who become nightmares....... Laura Lippman has suited up her main character of Gerry Andersen in the attire of a successful sixty-one year old author still riding on the coattails of his 2001 bestseller, Dream Girl. We find him in the process of closing a deal on a condo in Baltimore. He's left behind his former life in the Upper West Side of New York City. Regrets weigh heavy on him. The move wasn't really in his life plan. But Gerry had the care of his mother suffering from Alzheime Dream girls who become nightmares....... Laura Lippman has suited up her main character of Gerry Andersen in the attire of a successful sixty-one year old author still riding on the coattails of his 2001 bestseller, Dream Girl. We find him in the process of closing a deal on a condo in Baltimore. He's left behind his former life in the Upper West Side of New York City. Regrets weigh heavy on him. The move wasn't really in his life plan. But Gerry had the care of his mother suffering from Alzheimer's to consider in Baltimore. Ellie went faster than what the doctors had stated. Gerry's current address is Limbo. As Gerry gives his agent a tour of the new condo, we begin to get a tour of Gerry's past life. Married three times to three vastly different women, we get a sense that Gerry has a difficult time when it comes to decision-making. His past will begin to seep in at various moments in the storyline. Lippman will even have us visiting Gerry's complicated childhood and his relationship with his father. The man is a walking, breathing bestseller himself. Lordy! But Fate has a powerfully wacky sense of humor. The once elegant architectual feature of a floating staircase will toss Gerry rapidly down its backbone by one unfortunately misplaced step. Yup, our guy Gerry will now be spending week upon week in a special hospital bed on the main floor with his leg in traction. The good news is that he has a very dependable assistant, Victoria, who will run his errands. The not-so-good news is that he must muddle through with a napping night nurse, Aileen. Wowza! Laura Lippman has created the perfect storm in the likes of ol' Gerry and his unexpected life change. Lippman laces this one with wry humor and some laugh-out-loud situations that border on the macabre. She threads through references to the 1979 literary horror novel of Ghost Story by Peter Straub. It's a brilliant touch as to one's fruitless efforts to bury the past that keeps rearing its ugly head as it resurrects with jolting surprise. Good, good stuff. Dream Girl will have an appeal to readers who enjoy a burst of craziness in their literary diet. What keeps the pages turning is Gerry's exasperation and pure helplessness at the mercy of his past and current decisions. Success should ring independence. Not in Gerry's new world. Lippman certainly sends in the clowns with her characters with pointed hats. Dream Girl doesn't keep a lid on things once Pandora's Box is opened. A rollicking roll in LaLaLand. I received a copy of Dream Girl through NetGalley for an honest review. My thanks to HarperCollins Publishing and to the talented Laura Lippman for the opportunity.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Kemper

    As an aging man, there’s few things that can scare me more than the idea of falling down the stairs. So this one was keeping me up nights in a cold sweat. Gerry Anderson is a writer whose biggest success, a novel called Dream Girl, is the source of endless speculation about if the lead character was inspired by a real person despite Gerry’s absolute insistence that it wasn’t based on anybody. Gerry has moved back to his hometown of Baltimore to care for his ailing mother, but she dies soon after As an aging man, there’s few things that can scare me more than the idea of falling down the stairs. So this one was keeping me up nights in a cold sweat. Gerry Anderson is a writer whose biggest success, a novel called Dream Girl, is the source of endless speculation about if the lead character was inspired by a real person despite Gerry’s absolute insistence that it wasn’t based on anybody. Gerry has moved back to his hometown of Baltimore to care for his ailing mother, but she dies soon after he buys a swanky new apartment. After receiving a mysterious piece of mail, Gerry takes a tumble down the stairs and breaks his hip. Bedridden in his fancy apartment, Gerry has to rely on his assistant and a gruff night nurse for his care. That’s when he starts receiving phone calls from a woman claiming to be the actual inspiration for Dream Girl. An unnerved Gerry continues to insist that isn’t possible since the character was entirely fictional, but he finds it hard to prove his claims of being contacted. As he tries to sort out his confused state of mind, Gerry begins reflecting on his life, and while he would be the first to tell you that he’s always been a man who did his best to stay out of trouble, it becomes apparent that he’s left a string of women who might have grudges in his wake. Is it a disgruntled former lover tormenting him? Is it all just something he invented in a haze of pain killers and sleeping meds? Or is the dementia that his mother suffered from hitting him at an earlier age? I’ve only started reading Laura Lippmann in the last few years, but I’ve absolutely loved her writing. This is another example of why because it was an exceptionally tricky thing to pull off. On one level, it’s a story about a man trapped in a bed for most of the book, and it all hinges on putting the reader into his perspective. That means not just relying on the flashbacks scenes that eventually tell us who Gerry is, but also providing a steady stream of consciousness as his mind wanders. Not only does Lippmann makes this interesting, she makes all of it necessary. The character work done on Gerry is excellent because when we’re introduced to him, he seems like a pretty decent guy. A writer who came from a humble background, and the kind of guy who would leave his beloved New York lifestyle to care for his aging mother. Gradually, we start to understand that even when Gerry seems like he’s doing something for somebody else that there’s usually a selfish motive behind it even if he’s lying to himself about it. The mystery of who is claiming to be the actual Dream Girl starts to take a back seat to the holes in the history that Gerry has invented for himself, and in the end he’ll have to confront who he actually is and what he’s done. While I was able to guess a few things, there were still revelations made that made my jaw drop. There’s a few other works of fiction that seem similar, as if Lippman drew inspiration from a few sources, but it all comes together in a first rate work that feels original and unique.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Lisa of Troy

    Gerry Anderson is an author who had a bad little incident. While recovering, he keeps encountering his "Dream Girl", the girl that he wrote about in his famous novel. Is Gerry going mad or does this Dream Girl actually exist? Dream Girl definitely had some of my signature trademarks: it had imperfect characters who were trying their best, the storytelling was rather advanced (clearly a very talented author), and it even had a bit of steam. The book has very good character development where the MC Gerry Anderson is an author who had a bad little incident. While recovering, he keeps encountering his "Dream Girl", the girl that he wrote about in his famous novel. Is Gerry going mad or does this Dream Girl actually exist? Dream Girl definitely had some of my signature trademarks: it had imperfect characters who were trying their best, the storytelling was rather advanced (clearly a very talented author), and it even had a bit of steam. The book has very good character development where the MC, Gerry, is portrayed as a horrible human being, but (of course) he doesn't view himself that way. Gerry does offer the book a bit of high-brow humor, and I thought that the book was very funny and entertaining. Also, I did enjoy the mystery of finding out what was going on. None of the characters were doing silly things and ignoring perfectly obvious clues. We also see little flashbacks of Gerry's life which were also very entertaining. Overall, this is one of the more well-written thrillers that I have picked up recently. I look forward to reading future works by Lippman. *Thank you, NetGalley, for providing me a free copy of this book in exchange for my fair and honest opinion.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Kelly (and the Book Boar)

    Take a little of this . . . . A whole lotta this . . . . . With a sprinkle of this . . . . And you end up with this gem. I’ve read a handful of Laura Lippman books and they have all been winners for me. It’s safe to say she’s an auto-request at this point and the fact that this was available as a Read Now on NetGalley means no one even had to suffer the consequences of me being rejected an early copy . . . . Lippman is calling this her first work of horror and you know what? I thi Take a little of this . . . . A whole lotta this . . . . . With a sprinkle of this . . . . And you end up with this gem. I’ve read a handful of Laura Lippman books and they have all been winners for me. It’s safe to say she’s an auto-request at this point and the fact that this was available as a Read Now on NetGalley means no one even had to suffer the consequences of me being rejected an early copy . . . . Lippman is calling this her first work of horror and you know what? I think I’ll allow it. Most would probably label it a thriller since there are no things that go bump in the night or alien spider reveals, but it definitely had plenty of WTF??? and creep factor going for it that it could loosely fit into that genre. The tale here is about an aging author who takes a tumble leaving himself bedridden and housebound on traction with two broken legs. It’s also about the women in his life – both past and present. And that’s all you’re gonna get. Lippman is a great storyteller. Just read it. ARC provided by NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Thank you, NetGalley!

  22. 5 out of 5

    OutlawPoet

    I was…not enthralled by this one. You’ll see comparisons to Stephen King’s Misery and, yes, if you squint. It shares the basic skeleton of much of the plot. What it’s lacking is…everything else. If you take the bare bit of a suspense thriller out of it, it’s a self-indulgent character sketch of an author no one wants to know. As the main character brings us flashback after flashback, almost none of which have anything to do with the story, we realize: he’s kind of an officious jerk and is oh so pr I was…not enthralled by this one. You’ll see comparisons to Stephen King’s Misery and, yes, if you squint. It shares the basic skeleton of much of the plot. What it’s lacking is…everything else. If you take the bare bit of a suspense thriller out of it, it’s a self-indulgent character sketch of an author no one wants to know. As the main character brings us flashback after flashback, almost none of which have anything to do with the story, we realize: he’s kind of an officious jerk and is oh so proud of himself (gag). The little thriller bit is contrived and leaves you grasping for any hint of logic. It’s melodramatic in parts, deadly dull in others, and you end really wondering why the ‘unattractive penis’ bit was even a thing. Skip for me. *ARC Provided via Net Galley

  23. 4 out of 5

    Jasmine

    Did I enjoy reading from Gerry’s perspective? No. Was this a good book? Yes. That about sums up my feelings about this book. Gerry is a deplorable man who thinks quite well of himself and that his enemies are few. He is a semi-successful author who earns plenty of royalties from his hit book Dream Girl to live comfortably. When Gerry suffers a serious injury from an accident, he ends up on bed rest in his luxurious apartment and in the care of his assistant and nurse. While under a haze of pain Did I enjoy reading from Gerry’s perspective? No. Was this a good book? Yes. That about sums up my feelings about this book. Gerry is a deplorable man who thinks quite well of himself and that his enemies are few. He is a semi-successful author who earns plenty of royalties from his hit book Dream Girl to live comfortably. When Gerry suffers a serious injury from an accident, he ends up on bed rest in his luxurious apartment and in the care of his assistant and nurse. While under a haze of pain medication, Gerry starts receiving phone calls from someone claiming to be the inspiration for the main character in Dream Girl. Which is impossible because he completely invented that character. Constantly in a dreamlike state and on his cocktail of pain meds Gerry begins to lose touch with reality thus becoming an unreliable narrator. I did not enjoy being in Gerry’s head, but I also could not stop reading. He is a misogynist who believes he has almost no possible enemies except for, maybe, his three ex-wives and one recent ex-girlfriend. He has no idea who could possibly be impersonating his fictionalized heroine. This book jumps around from the present time to key moments throughout Gerry’s life. The sections on his past may seem random, but by the end they all fit together to reveal a nauseating truth. The comparison to King’s Misery is definitely apt in this novel. CW: sexual assault. This is my first Laura Lippman book, but it will certainly not be my last! Thanks to Faber and Faber and Netgalley for the digital ARC.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Marialyce (absltmom, yaya)

    3.5 stars Not quite sure of what to make of this one...... Gerry Andersen is a bit of a cad. He's a successful author with his first novel blowing up the best seller list. However, that was a few years ago, three wives ago, and numerous affairs in the past. Gerry had an accident and falls an injures his leg requiring a short stay and a patch up in the hospital and then back to his penthouse apartment in Baltimore attended by a nurse and his literary assistant. Gerry is confined to bed and receives 3.5 stars Not quite sure of what to make of this one...... Gerry Andersen is a bit of a cad. He's a successful author with his first novel blowing up the best seller list. However, that was a few years ago, three wives ago, and numerous affairs in the past. Gerry had an accident and falls an injures his leg requiring a short stay and a patch up in the hospital and then back to his penthouse apartment in Baltimore attended by a nurse and his literary assistant. Gerry is confined to bed and receives a bit of a shock when one of his ex-wives appears with hands outstretched because she is "apartmentless" (Gerry sold his New York digs) and out of cash. The interaction between the two is heated and Gerry recalls his marriage to her and his other failed attempts at wedded bliss. Seems like Gerry is always being "coerced" into having affairs and one-night stands. (See what I mean about being a cad? ) However, troubling times are upon Gerry as he receives a letter and telephone calls from the "dream girl" who is in his book. Claiming she was a totally fictitious character, his mind starts to wonder aided by drugs, particularly Ambien (who knew?) in dreams that turn nightmarish. Then one morning Gerry awakens and finds a nasty surprise at the end of his bed and the drug induced state he has been in, provides little in the way of memory. Certainly, something or someone sinister is afoot and as the story continues, we are more and more privy to his mind. While Gerry meanders down memory lane, we delve deeper into his character or lack thereof. He is despicable and there are times when reading and following his nightly dreams that one might think the devil is chasing Gerry. The pace of the story is slow, but the ending is of the sort that makes one believe in karma. I enjoyed the book overall, although I kept on wondering how this all would tie together. Thank you to NetGalley for a copy of this psychologically motivated thriller.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Liz Barnsley

    I absolutely devoured this literary delight from Laura Lippman, the story is incredibly haunting, a little creepy which really added to the ambience of the read. It's a twisted tale told in a noir horror style, the characters pop and it is beautifully unpredictable with a thought provoking kick ass ending. Easily one of the best books I've read this year. I absolutely devoured this literary delight from Laura Lippman, the story is incredibly haunting, a little creepy which really added to the ambience of the read. It's a twisted tale told in a noir horror style, the characters pop and it is beautifully unpredictable with a thought provoking kick ass ending. Easily one of the best books I've read this year.

  26. 4 out of 5

    MicheleReader

    Gerry Andersen is a popular author. His bestseller, Dream Girl, is about Aubrey, a twenty-something woman and her 72-hour affair with an older man. Legions of fans love to speculate as to who was the inspiration for its main character. Gerry insists the story is purely fiction. The 61-year-old author has had a lot of experience with women. Three ex-wives, almost a fourth and a string of liaisons. He believes he’s a good guy who has treated the women in his life well. He's a man with some serious Gerry Andersen is a popular author. His bestseller, Dream Girl, is about Aubrey, a twenty-something woman and her 72-hour affair with an older man. Legions of fans love to speculate as to who was the inspiration for its main character. Gerry insists the story is purely fiction. The 61-year-old author has had a lot of experience with women. Three ex-wives, almost a fourth and a string of liaisons. He believes he’s a good guy who has treated the women in his life well. He's a man with some serious lack of self awareness! Gerry has relocated from New York City to Baltimore to care for his mother. When she dies after suffering from dementia, Gerry has a freak accident and is bedridden. Personal assistant Victoria and night nurse Aileen provide round-the-clock help. A letter arrives (and mysteriously disappears) from someone named Aubrey. Then, a woman who says she is the real Aubrey keeps calling Gerry. A Twitter account in her name appears with some very personal information about Gerry. Is he hallucinating? If not, who is behind this? Laura Lippman has created a suspenseful thriller with shades of Stephen King’s Misery. The story, told in very short chapters, alternates from the present and various periods in Gerry’s past. Mostly while heavily medicated, Gerry recalls his relationship with his mother, his unfaithful father, his few close friends, the history of his marriages and his days as a visiting college professor as well as a touring author. There’s a lot going on and a lot to keep you guessing as the pieces of this puzzle (for the most part) start to come together with great “antici……pation,” as the book quotes Tim Curry in The Rocky Horror Picture Show. (There are other smile-worthy references to movies and books.) I enjoyed Dream Girl. Even though Gerry was too much of a clueless, misogynist jerk to care much about, I couldn’t put the book down. I appreciated the humorous and satirical aspects and without giving anything away, it was ultimately satisfying. Many thanks to Williams Morrow / HarperCollins and Edelweiss+ for the opportunity to read this well-done thriller in advance of its June 22, 2021 publication. Review on MicheleReader.com.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Erin (from Long Island, NY)

    I’d definitely recommend the audiobook version. The narrator did a great job capturing the main characters attitude & just overall nature. Really good.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Lisa of Troy

    Gerry Anderson is an author who had a bad little incident. While recovering, he keeps encountering his "Dream Girl", the girl that he wrote about in his famous novel. Is Gerry going mad or does this Dream Girl actually exist? Dream Girl definitely had some of my signature trademarks: it had imperfect characters who were trying their best, the storytelling was rather advanced (clearly a very talented author), and it even had a bit of steam. The book has very good character development where the MC Gerry Anderson is an author who had a bad little incident. While recovering, he keeps encountering his "Dream Girl", the girl that he wrote about in his famous novel. Is Gerry going mad or does this Dream Girl actually exist? Dream Girl definitely had some of my signature trademarks: it had imperfect characters who were trying their best, the storytelling was rather advanced (clearly a very talented author), and it even had a bit of steam. The book has very good character development where the MC, Gerry, is portrayed as a horrible human being, but (of course) he doesn't view himself that way. Gerry does offer the book a bit of high-brow humor, and I thought that the book was very funny and entertaining. Also, I did enjoy the mystery of finding out what was going on. None of the characters were doing silly things and ignoring perfectly obvious clues. We also see little flashbacks of Gerry's life which were also very entertaining. Overall, this is one of the more well-written thrillers that I have picked up recently. I look forward to reading future works by Lippman.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jayne

    I kept on dreaming that DREAM GIRL would get better, but it never did. NEVER JUDGE A BOOK BY ITS COVER. The book's stunning cover was compelling, intriguing and helped set expectations high. Laura Lippman is a talented author and I was cautiously optimistic when I selected this book since I had enjoyed many of her earlier titles. Also, I usually prefer "different" over "same old, same old" and this book was a "different" Laura Lippman book. I respect an author who takes chances but the chances tha I kept on dreaming that DREAM GIRL would get better, but it never did. NEVER JUDGE A BOOK BY ITS COVER. The book's stunning cover was compelling, intriguing and helped set expectations high. Laura Lippman is a talented author and I was cautiously optimistic when I selected this book since I had enjoyed many of her earlier titles. Also, I usually prefer "different" over "same old, same old" and this book was a "different" Laura Lippman book. I respect an author who takes chances but the chances that Laura Lippman took just never elevated the storyline for me. I had a difficult time connecting with the book's protagonist and perhaps that is why this book left me flat. I listened to the audiobook and the book's narration was excellent. My favorite thing about this book was its cover. Two stars, rounded up.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Carol

    Gerry Anderson, author of the best-seller 'Dream Girl', has suffered serious injuries in a fall in his new apartment and is confined to a hospital bed in the apartment. His assistant Victoria and a night nurse named Aileen look after all his needs. Gerry has a lot of time to reminisce about the past and the many women in his life. He's also been getting calls from a woman claiming to be Aubrey, the protagonist in his novel, but Gerry has always insisted that she's fictional and not based on a re Gerry Anderson, author of the best-seller 'Dream Girl', has suffered serious injuries in a fall in his new apartment and is confined to a hospital bed in the apartment. His assistant Victoria and a night nurse named Aileen look after all his needs. Gerry has a lot of time to reminisce about the past and the many women in his life. He's also been getting calls from a woman claiming to be Aubrey, the protagonist in his novel, but Gerry has always insisted that she's fictional and not based on a real person. There are mixed reviews for this book but I really liked it and thought it was very clever. I loved all the movie and book references and, strange as it seems, got quite a few chuckles out of the story. The story goes back and forth in time and we slowly get a mental picture of Gerry. As the communications from 'Aubrey' continue, Gerry thinks back on his life and wonders whether there's a woman he has wronged but decides his conscience is clear, except for ...., but no, that couldn't be it! This happens a few times and we come to realize that Gerry's perception of himself and his actions is quite different from that of the ladies in his life. The ending caught me unaware but I think it was fitting. A favourite quote from this ARC: "Jokes that were fine a few years ago are now deemed offensive. Words are being outlawed and weaponized." My thanks to Netgalley and Faber and Faber Ltd. for the opportunity to read an ARC of this book. Publication Date: July 1, 2021

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