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The Other Half of Church: Christian Community, Brain Science, and Overcoming Spiritual Stagnation

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Could brain science be the key to spiritual formation? Why does true Christian transformation seem fleeting? And why does church often feel lonely, Christian community shallow, and leaders untrustworthy? For many Christians, the delight of encountering Christ eventually dwindles—and disappointment sets in. Is lasting joy possible? These are some of the questions Michel Hendr Could brain science be the key to spiritual formation? Why does true Christian transformation seem fleeting? And why does church often feel lonely, Christian community shallow, and leaders untrustworthy? For many Christians, the delight of encountering Christ eventually dwindles—and disappointment sets in. Is lasting joy possible? These are some of the questions Michel Hendricks has considered both in his experience as a spiritual formation pastor and in his lifetime as a Christian. He began to find answers when he met Jim Wilder—a neurotheologian. Using brain science, Wilder identified that there are two halves of the church: the rational half and the relational half. And when Christians only embrace the rational half, churches become unhealthy places where transformation doesn’t last and narcissistic leaders flourish. In The Other Half of Church, join Michel and Jim's journey as they couple brain science with the Bible to identify how to overcome spiritual stagnation by living a full-brained faith. You'll also learn the four ingredients necessary to develop and maintain a vibrant transformational community where spiritual formation occurs, relationships flourish, and the toxic spread of narcissism is eradicated.


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Could brain science be the key to spiritual formation? Why does true Christian transformation seem fleeting? And why does church often feel lonely, Christian community shallow, and leaders untrustworthy? For many Christians, the delight of encountering Christ eventually dwindles—and disappointment sets in. Is lasting joy possible? These are some of the questions Michel Hendr Could brain science be the key to spiritual formation? Why does true Christian transformation seem fleeting? And why does church often feel lonely, Christian community shallow, and leaders untrustworthy? For many Christians, the delight of encountering Christ eventually dwindles—and disappointment sets in. Is lasting joy possible? These are some of the questions Michel Hendricks has considered both in his experience as a spiritual formation pastor and in his lifetime as a Christian. He began to find answers when he met Jim Wilder—a neurotheologian. Using brain science, Wilder identified that there are two halves of the church: the rational half and the relational half. And when Christians only embrace the rational half, churches become unhealthy places where transformation doesn’t last and narcissistic leaders flourish. In The Other Half of Church, join Michel and Jim's journey as they couple brain science with the Bible to identify how to overcome spiritual stagnation by living a full-brained faith. You'll also learn the four ingredients necessary to develop and maintain a vibrant transformational community where spiritual formation occurs, relationships flourish, and the toxic spread of narcissism is eradicated.

30 review for The Other Half of Church: Christian Community, Brain Science, and Overcoming Spiritual Stagnation

  1. 5 out of 5

    Tyler Collins

    This is an excellent book (perhaps the most important I have ever read) on discipleship. It seeks to answer the question, "Why we have had so many people in the church who profess faith in Jesus but have had so few people who actually become like Jesus?" It answered this and other related questions about the lack of character change in Christians (including myself). Wilder and Hendricks advocate The Life Model for life and ministry—which highlights the need for "full-brained Christianity," Christ This is an excellent book (perhaps the most important I have ever read) on discipleship. It seeks to answer the question, "Why we have had so many people in the church who profess faith in Jesus but have had so few people who actually become like Jesus?" It answered this and other related questions about the lack of character change in Christians (including myself). Wilder and Hendricks advocate The Life Model for life and ministry—which highlights the need for "full-brained Christianity," Christianity that does not neglect our right brain functions (dominant, relational, emotional, identity-forming) because of an overemphasis on our left brain functions (submissive, intellectual, practical, problem-solving). This "full-brained Christianity" can only happen in communities of faith that are joy-filled, loving families with a strong group identity and a healthy culture of correction. Discipleship must be, in a word, relational. I was stunned at the important revelations the latest brain science now contributes to how we should be living as the church. Chapter 3 on Joy ('Joy: The Face of Jesus that Transforms') and Chapter 6 on Shame ('Healthy Correction: Stop Being so Nice') rocked my world. I cannot wait to begin to incorporate some of the practices Wilder and Hendricks suggest into my personal spiritual life and communal church life. Our church (St. Aidan's Anglican Church in Kansas City) is using this book to guide us into the new season ahead, and we are discerning right now how to transform the way we do discipleship and church life based on what we are learning from The Life Model. We are thrilled for what the Lord has in store for our community.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Megan

    I rarely write reviews because I’m not that great at it. This book came at a time when I’m studying spiritual formation and discipleship methods in the western Church. Sometimes they work, most of the time they don’t. Generally, we use left-brained methods, thanks to the Enlightenment. Just think the right doctrine and all will be well. Will that form us into the image of Jesus? Sadly, it often does not. The authors argue for a Whole-brained Christianity. “We understand for the first time how ou I rarely write reviews because I’m not that great at it. This book came at a time when I’m studying spiritual formation and discipleship methods in the western Church. Sometimes they work, most of the time they don’t. Generally, we use left-brained methods, thanks to the Enlightenment. Just think the right doctrine and all will be well. Will that form us into the image of Jesus? Sadly, it often does not. The authors argue for a Whole-brained Christianity. “We understand for the first time how our Creator designed our brains to form our character into the image of His Son” (p. 206) This book does not offer quick fixes. It requires practice and time to engage in whole-brained spiritual activities. The compelling picture the authors paint of a vibrant, joyful, whole-brained body of Christ compels me to start practicing now. “The mysteries of love, applied to the way the brain learns, offer us hope for overcoming our spiritual stagnation and becoming whole-brained Christians” (p. 207) Highly recommend!

  3. 5 out of 5

    John Muriango

    The book main gist is on a topic that is chief of all believers: Growth in maturity to Christlikeness, unfortunately, it's approach is what I believe isn't supported by Scriptures. Yes, our minds needs renewal, but it is not through 'neurotheology', a term which came over the past few years, and hasn't been applied, or even known by the historical Church. So, the treatment suggested by this book is wanting as it source is man-centred, not God or Gospel centred. The book main gist is on a topic that is chief of all believers: Growth in maturity to Christlikeness, unfortunately, it's approach is what I believe isn't supported by Scriptures. Yes, our minds needs renewal, but it is not through 'neurotheology', a term which came over the past few years, and hasn't been applied, or even known by the historical Church. So, the treatment suggested by this book is wanting as it source is man-centred, not God or Gospel centred.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Ben

    Really good content, but gave the impression that the authors were paid by the word. Not the kind of book to read once and then put aside. The ideas this book presents need to be practiced if it is to have value in the reader's life. Really good content, but gave the impression that the authors were paid by the word. Not the kind of book to read once and then put aside. The ideas this book presents need to be practiced if it is to have value in the reader's life.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Diana Gugel

    Really interesting and helpful.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Emily

    Very interesting insights into how the brain functions and how we are designed to worship.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Devin Moran

    introduced to neuro-theology and the need to re-invest in narratives of what discipleship means and how it should function in the church. I feel like it opened up a space for how to engage in loving “the least of us”. After finishing the book, I felt the contemplative effects of joy and faith rising up. It can be super heady/nerdy in the beginning.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Harmony

    A fascinating look into how God designed our brains to grow through joyful, faithful, loving community! The Church is not a relic, in fact, when it's healthy it's the most vital factor in growing to me more like Jesus. This book identified the desires I've felt for our gatherings. Especially prescient given our 2020 gathering restrictions. The Church is vital! A fascinating look into how God designed our brains to grow through joyful, faithful, loving community! The Church is not a relic, in fact, when it's healthy it's the most vital factor in growing to me more like Jesus. This book identified the desires I've felt for our gatherings. Especially prescient given our 2020 gathering restrictions. The Church is vital!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Pastor Chapman

    The Other Half of Church was disappointing. I was drawn in by the title and premise of the book, hoping to be able to serve my church more effectively. The actual premise of the book is helpful: a large portion, half or more, of people in our churches do not learn or grow from the traditional ways we "do church." The right brain is often neglected in the ways in which we do church. Since the right brain is neglected, we cannot expect people to grow as we desire them to grow. Wilder and Hendricks The Other Half of Church was disappointing. I was drawn in by the title and premise of the book, hoping to be able to serve my church more effectively. The actual premise of the book is helpful: a large portion, half or more, of people in our churches do not learn or grow from the traditional ways we "do church." The right brain is often neglected in the ways in which we do church. Since the right brain is neglected, we cannot expect people to grow as we desire them to grow. Wilder and Hendricks contend that "if we want to grow and transform our character into the character of Jesus, we must involve activities that stimulate and develop the right side of the brain." They suggest that the four essentials for growth are joy, love, identity, and community. Neglect of any one of those four essential elements will hinder growth into Christlikeness. All of that sounds great, and the first two chapter were incredibly informative and helpful. The problem is the absolute lack of practicality. The chapter about hesed love is the without question the most practical chapter of the book, listing many practical ways church communities can begin to grow love for one another and create an environment of love in one's church. However, the other chapters lack practicality. In the instances when the authors try to offer practical application, the applications are generic: greet each other, look at each other in the face and light up, make eye contact, etc. Unfortunately, The Other Half of Church was a book with great potential and a great beginning but one which lacked the practical application and step-by-step guide to help church leaders implement the authors' ideas. The book becomes merely informative and leaves the reader with questions regarding how to implement the ideas from the book and wondering whether or not they are implementing those ideas correctly. I was provided with a free copy of this book by Moody Publisher's as part of their blog review program.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Ethan

    An appeal to consider "right brain" Christianity. The primary voice is Hendricks, although the book would have been better if had been just straight up from Wilder, since all the insights really come from Wilder et al. The book is an application of the present condition of brain science: the belief that there are two hemispheres at work, that all input begins in the right brain, the seat of the emotions, impulse, and connection, and eventually get processed in the left brain, the seat of analysis An appeal to consider "right brain" Christianity. The primary voice is Hendricks, although the book would have been better if had been just straight up from Wilder, since all the insights really come from Wilder et al. The book is an application of the present condition of brain science: the belief that there are two hemispheres at work, that all input begins in the right brain, the seat of the emotions, impulse, and connection, and eventually get processed in the left brain, the seat of analysis, etc. Much of church work ends up focusing on left brain things: the acquisition and distribution of knowledge. The author makes appeal for use of the right brain, and does so through three constructs: joy, relational unity and group cohesion. His association between hesed and relational unity is creative even if lexically suspicious. He speaks of the importance of correction to reinforce the value of community boundaries but doing so by reminding people that their transgression is not who they are in Christ. He warns about narcissism and makes his appeal that a more full brained church would resist it. There's a lot that makes sense here: relational unity is a main theological theme in Scripture, and belonging a powerful drive. Yet some warnings are in order. First of all, as said above - why didn't Wilder just write the information? Secondly, the author pointed out how the way a lot of us think the brain works is inaccurate, based on older information proved to be inaccurate, and so it must be asked: how sound is the information on which this analysis is built? Will it need significant correction from a later generation who understands that much more about the brain? Regardless, envisioning the life of a congregation in terms of more than information distribution is a definite positive. **--galley received as part of early review program

  11. 5 out of 5

    Charles Causey

    Wow-I read "The Other Half of Church" over the holidays and it is a powerful, impacting read. There is so much good information to soak in. I greatly appreciated Michel Hendricks' writing style, constantly sprinkling in real-life stories of how the material changes lives. This book was so fascinating that while reading it I was talking about it to family members and friends who happened to walk by. Some of the highlights besides the neuroscience include Michel's description of Hesed love and Hes Wow-I read "The Other Half of Church" over the holidays and it is a powerful, impacting read. There is so much good information to soak in. I greatly appreciated Michel Hendricks' writing style, constantly sprinkling in real-life stories of how the material changes lives. This book was so fascinating that while reading it I was talking about it to family members and friends who happened to walk by. Some of the highlights besides the neuroscience include Michel's description of Hesed love and Hesed communities, the importance of joy, the importance of looking into another's face while speaking to them, and the material on narcissistic behavior. The relationship, as explained in this book, between shame and narcissism is fascinating, and I think the authors nailed an important trend in our churches regarding pastors. Highly recommend! A must read for one interested in Christian growth. Would be the perfect book for your next small group study, or a gift for one you love.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Brad Sitzer

    Great learning but the author takes way to long to get to the point. This book could have been a GREAT blog post.

  13. 5 out of 5

    William Stapleton

    Having read Rare Leadership by Jim Wilder, and found his adaptations of brain science for Christian growth appropriate, I have been appalled at this mess. Hendricks is clearly angry and bitter at "the church" (perhaps over his failure as director of spiritual formation at his previous church), and it shows through in much of his writing. Don't get me wrong, the major premise and some of the supporting material - that we can use neuropsychology as an aid to understanding discipleship and spiritua Having read Rare Leadership by Jim Wilder, and found his adaptations of brain science for Christian growth appropriate, I have been appalled at this mess. Hendricks is clearly angry and bitter at "the church" (perhaps over his failure as director of spiritual formation at his previous church), and it shows through in much of his writing. Don't get me wrong, the major premise and some of the supporting material - that we can use neuropsychology as an aid to understanding discipleship and spiritual formation - is not incorrect. But it seems as if, in an effort to marshall enough material for a book, based upon, not his own research, but teaching he received from Jim Wilder -- who, by the way, is also not a neuropsychologist, but comes a great deal closer to it than Hendricks does -- Hendricks goes too far time and again in accusing the church of failure in its mission to make disciples of all the nations (Matthew 28:19). Here is but one example: "God’s face is connected with joy in the Bible. One of the first Scriptures I memorized when I was a new Christian was Psalm 16:11, “In Your presence is fullness of joy” (NASB). However, the original Hebrew renders this verse, “abundance of joy with your face.” Psalm 21 lists the blessings of God for the king of Israel. In verse 6, the psalmist proclaims, “You make him joyful with gladness in Your presence” (NASB). The word-for-word rendering of the Hebrew is, “You make him happy with joy with your face.” In Scripture, we see that the face of God brings us joy, but God’s face gets erased in translation. Some versions of the Bible alter the image of God’s face shining on us, presenting a more generic concept of God’s presence and favor. Translators may do this to make the text more readable, but an important bodily sensation is lost. “The light of God’s presence” does not feel the same in our bodies as “the light of God’s face.” God designed facial recognition circuitry into our brains and linked it to our joy center. My wife’s face lights up when she sees me, and this initiates a joyful chain reaction in my brain that I can feel in my body." With apologies to Wm Shakespeare, Methinks the [gentleman] doth protest too much. This is but one example where the author writes his own preconceived notions into his Biblical interpretation. In his attempt to redefine discipleship in the trendy terminology of neuropsychology, Hendricks tries to distinguish between the light provided by God’s face and the light provided by God’s presence. Sadly, in the passage quoted above, the Hebrew word for presence פָּנִים (pānîm). Face. He correctly identifies the definition of the word as “Face”. But then he goes on to make much of the literal translation of the word versus the dynamic translation offered by NASB. Yes, the Hebrew word is literally face, but one’s face may also be more correctly characterized as one’s whole presence, not just the “skin that covers the front of the skull.” But Hendricks, incredibly, makes just such a comparison when he says that it is the facial recognition circuitry in our brains that recognize God’s face and that that is connected to our joy center. At the risk of seeming overly critical, I must point out that God (YHWH of the Old Testament) is a Spirit and has no face for our facial recognition circuitry, either finely honed through Hendricks’ discipleship method or otherwise, to recognize. This is probably why the translators of the NASB lean on words like “presence”, instead of the more literal “face.” Most Jews would be appalled at a Hebrew translation that implied God has a literal face by which He can be recognized. I do not wish to belabor the point, but Mr. Hendricks' work reads through and through as written by someone who is trying extremely hard to prove that the church has a problem and he has the matching answer. His assessment of the problem is possibly correct, if overstated, but pop-psychology carefully decorated with stale Christianese is not the answer. For those hoping to discover the source of your spiritual stagnation, try actually poking your nose into Scripture.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Peggy

    I am fascinated by all things related to the brain and learning. I also love theology. So when I had a chance to review The Other Half of Church: Christian Community, Brain Science, and Overcoming Spiritual Stagnation by Jim Wilder and Michel Hendricks from Moody Publishing, I jumped at the chance. This was a combination that I did not know existed. You do not have to be someone who geeks out over the brain to get something out of this book. Being around the church world for many years, specific I am fascinated by all things related to the brain and learning. I also love theology. So when I had a chance to review The Other Half of Church: Christian Community, Brain Science, and Overcoming Spiritual Stagnation by Jim Wilder and Michel Hendricks from Moody Publishing, I jumped at the chance. This was a combination that I did not know existed. You do not have to be someone who geeks out over the brain to get something out of this book. Being around the church world for many years, specifically in leadership roles, I have been deeply disappointed at the lack of maturity and growth even after years of discipleship. There seems to be a disconnect between what people are learning and what people are living. This book addresses that disconnect and then offers practical ways to strengthen and grow that connection. "When we neglect right-brain development in our discipleship, we ignore the side of the brain that specializes in character formation. Left-brained discipleship emphasizes beliefs, doctrine, willpower, and strategies but neglects right-brain loving attachments, joy, emotional development, and identity. Ignoring right-brain relational development creates Christians who believe in God’s love but have difficulty experiencing it in daily life, especially during distress." Joy, attachment, and gratitude are the soil to grow a deeply connected and mature community that loves and impacts their community including their enemies. Hendricks and Wilder share how we spend so much time with knowledge and forget that the way to connect to that knowledge is through the right hemisphere of the brain. There needs to be relational connection to help the knowledge find a home and application. I found much of the truth in this book to also be very applicable in the sphere of education. I was thinking of the teachers who impact their students most are relational. Students tend to love their subject, relationships and group identity are strong in those classes. There is so much that I will be coming back to and working on practicing in my own life and revisiting to figure out how it applies to the community I am in. It helped me to name what I could sense was missing. It has given me much to think about, evaluate, and practice in my own life and will be seeking ways to implement some of what I learned in the community I am part of. I highly recommend this book for anyone looking for a deeper connection to God and their community. This is a book deeply rooted in Scripture and very accessible brain science. Each chapter ends with group questions that lead the group to Scripture and then simple activities to try out. Every chapter has more resources if desired and the appendices have checklists and resources that are valuable and so user friendly. *Disclaimer: I was given a copy from Moody Publishing for review. All opinions are my own.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Ian

    I wasn't sure what I was expecting when I selected this book on NetGalley. I had only just started it when my access to it was restricted so I bought it as I was so struck by the wisdom in the opening chapters. What this book highlights is a missing ingredient on a lot of spiritual formation work: the importance of understanding how the brain works. I didn't appreciate this until I read this book and it makes sense having for a while now struggled understanding how to go even deeper in Christ. I I wasn't sure what I was expecting when I selected this book on NetGalley. I had only just started it when my access to it was restricted so I bought it as I was so struck by the wisdom in the opening chapters. What this book highlights is a missing ingredient on a lot of spiritual formation work: the importance of understanding how the brain works. I didn't appreciate this until I read this book and it makes sense having for a while now struggled understanding how to go even deeper in Christ. I figured so long as continue a discipline of adopting various spiritual practices that would be sufficient. But we need 'joy' and 'hesed' through deep relational connection to help facilitate our practices. There is so much 'meat' in this work and it's one of those books that will require a number of repeat reads plus there are a number of appendices with various exercises which are also very useful but mostly in a church context, not an individual one. This book has whet my appetite for more of Wilder's psychological perspectives and I'm keen to study more. As I mentioned I was fortunate to receive an early ebook version from the publisher via NetGalley with no expectation of. favourable review. However, I have also bought a Kindle copy for myself.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Siv

    I had some helpful conversations with this book. I had more great conversations with my pastor-husband about this book. Our brains are wired for relationship - and neuroscience proves it. The gospel of Jesus centers (and recenters us) on love, and to be honest, it makes me more than a little sick that church - or at least, a lot of churches - has become so focused on ministry that we have misplaced the proper emphasis on love. Love, joy, relationships all ought to be at the center of every intera I had some helpful conversations with this book. I had more great conversations with my pastor-husband about this book. Our brains are wired for relationship - and neuroscience proves it. The gospel of Jesus centers (and recenters us) on love, and to be honest, it makes me more than a little sick that church - or at least, a lot of churches - has become so focused on ministry that we have misplaced the proper emphasis on love. Love, joy, relationships all ought to be at the center of every interaction related to church. Instead we stress theology and structure and wonder why people don't grow. Or walk away dissatisfied. My biggest concern with this book, however, is the emphasis on "healthy shame," loving correction within a relational community. I don't think the idea is wrong, but I haven't encountered many church communities with enough emotional health to use shame as anything but a weapon. The authors admit that our churches may not be safe, and acknowledge that the first step is to create a culture of love, joy, community, etc, but they don't go far enough in telling the people in the pews, or even the people in low-level leadership, what to do if the top leadership isn't already leading the way in creating that culture.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Jan

    Two men have introduced you to a way to revolutionize your spiritual growth, through a method of brain science. I know this sounds boring and deadly but if you apply the principals of this brain science your Christian life will become more vibrant and transformed. Four major ingredients are necessary to develop this new community way of thinking True Joy found through connection and relationships Hesed love of securely attached communities Well-developed group identity based on the character of Chr Two men have introduced you to a way to revolutionize your spiritual growth, through a method of brain science. I know this sounds boring and deadly but if you apply the principals of this brain science your Christian life will become more vibrant and transformed. Four major ingredients are necessary to develop this new community way of thinking True Joy found through connection and relationships Hesed love of securely attached communities Well-developed group identity based on the character of Christ Culture of uplifting healthy correction Dallas Willard and his book, “Renovation of the heart”, published in 2002 formed a lot of the background of this new method. It is best used as an application with the exercises followed in the appendixes of the book. With this book you can analyze whether your church need a new vision and look at community, and group process. I felt our church measured up quite well, even though they have not applied these principles, perhaps you will be interested in learning more, and overcome spiritual stagnation in your fellowship.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Noah Filipiak

    I didn't connect with the second half of the book as much (on group identity, correction, and narcissism), but the first half (on half-brained, joy, and hesed) was so good, even life-changing, that I still had to go with 5 stars. It may have been that the latter topics weren't new concepts to me, but the first half topics were. So I wanted to be honest with this review, but also don't want it to be lost that first half of the book is one of the more transformative things I've read in a very long I didn't connect with the second half of the book as much (on group identity, correction, and narcissism), but the first half (on half-brained, joy, and hesed) was so good, even life-changing, that I still had to go with 5 stars. It may have been that the latter topics weren't new concepts to me, but the first half topics were. So I wanted to be honest with this review, but also don't want it to be lost that first half of the book is one of the more transformative things I've read in a very long time and something that has altered how I see and do community and ministry, as well as paths for my own spiritual growth and transformation. Very thankful.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Alex

    This book is for anyone that is wanting more from church. A more holistic approach to your disciple relationship with others. It starts with a whole brain approach with our with God (we in western society focus on just the left brain). Starts with joy with God and ourselves. Through our full joy tank we are able to walk with others in a real and authentic disciplining relationship where Jesus is working in and through us. Warning, this book doesn’t hold back and names some pervasive issues surro This book is for anyone that is wanting more from church. A more holistic approach to your disciple relationship with others. It starts with a whole brain approach with our with God (we in western society focus on just the left brain). Starts with joy with God and ourselves. Through our full joy tank we are able to walk with others in a real and authentic disciplining relationship where Jesus is working in and through us. Warning, this book doesn’t hold back and names some pervasive issues surrounding our current church culture. Love the honest assessment and how to address it. Really enjoyed the book!

  20. 5 out of 5

    Joseph Chung

    A book that emphasises human methods rather than biblical truth. Seldom sees God's dimension; majority on human's side. In transformation, neuroscience is the key, the Holy Spirit and the truth play little part - You can't even see instructions on thanksgiving in Appendix B in the book, which is a section on how to remain joyful in gratitude! I don't see much in the book talking about believer's relationship with God as a key to personal growth, which is ridiculous. If you are not not a discernin A book that emphasises human methods rather than biblical truth. Seldom sees God's dimension; majority on human's side. In transformation, neuroscience is the key, the Holy Spirit and the truth play little part - You can't even see instructions on thanksgiving in Appendix B in the book, which is a section on how to remain joyful in gratitude! I don't see much in the book talking about believer's relationship with God as a key to personal growth, which is ridiculous. If you are not not a discerning Christian, this book is not recommended.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Darth Readius

    This book tries to address one of my big complaints against the Christian church. They very poorly act out their beliefs. This book says the problem is that our churches lack maturity and don't know how to develop it because we only use half our brain. Churches never focus on the right side, which is the emotional and relational side of the brain. Or as I would call it, the unconscious or emotional part of our personality. This book tries to address one of my big complaints against the Christian church. They very poorly act out their beliefs. This book says the problem is that our churches lack maturity and don't know how to develop it because we only use half our brain. Churches never focus on the right side, which is the emotional and relational side of the brain. Or as I would call it, the unconscious or emotional part of our personality.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Scott

    Must read by all! This book is such a great intro to the understanding of how God created us to live in Joy and to truly love Him and truly love others. I have been part of the American church since I was a child and the understanding of true maturity was never introduced. I can’t wait for my friends to read this and see what God will do in and through their lives!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Sue

    Wonderful book but it limits sharing capabilities This is an amazing book that has so many good things that are worth while sharing but there is cap on how many times you can do that. It ruined all the excitement I had in explaining what I was learning with friends I was trying to create HESED with. Bummer!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Tim Hall

    It's a great look at narcism in church leadership and how to gently love people back to a position of looking like Jesus. Being multi-dimensional is incredibly important when it comes to teaching/modeling/preaching in the church environment so all segments of our brain are empowered to learn and be transformed. It's a great look at narcism in church leadership and how to gently love people back to a position of looking like Jesus. Being multi-dimensional is incredibly important when it comes to teaching/modeling/preaching in the church environment so all segments of our brain are empowered to learn and be transformed.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Tamar K

    Interesting take and important points to consider, but I also think he tried too hard to come up with new 'catch phrases' for Christian identity. They felt forced and unnatural. I would have liked to see more foundation in the Christian history and orthodoxy, to see how Christians through the ages wrestled with this and the practices they developed along the way. Interesting take and important points to consider, but I also think he tried too hard to come up with new 'catch phrases' for Christian identity. They felt forced and unnatural. I would have liked to see more foundation in the Christian history and orthodoxy, to see how Christians through the ages wrestled with this and the practices they developed along the way.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Mark Wilson

    Fascinating to see how God designed or brain to be in relationship with Him and others. Joy, relational connection are things we all desire and this book talks through how to build a community based on them.

  27. 5 out of 5

    zachtaylort

    This is one of the best and most important books I have ever read. It is required reading for any follower of Christ.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Shell

    Excellent

  29. 5 out of 5

    Austin Glenn

    One of the most helpful books I’ve read on Spiritual Formation.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Chris Haven

    One of the best books I've ever read on spiritual transformation. Takes Dallas Willard's foundation and builds a second level. I will be digging deeper into the ideas I've seen here. One of the best books I've ever read on spiritual transformation. Takes Dallas Willard's foundation and builds a second level. I will be digging deeper into the ideas I've seen here.

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