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The Woodshed Mystery

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The old farm where Grandfather grew up is full of stories. The Aldens must find out the truth about a devastating fire and a secret dating back to the Revolutionary War!


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The old farm where Grandfather grew up is full of stories. The Aldens must find out the truth about a devastating fire and a secret dating back to the Revolutionary War!

30 review for The Woodshed Mystery

  1. 5 out of 5

    Katt Hansen

    Very nice Revolutionary war twist on a classic secret passage mystery. I hadn't heard about the smuggling of weapons and gunpowder during the Revolutionary War so I enjoyed discovering something new. Good mystery. Also, it's interesting seeing the kids so grown up. I had to keep reminding myself that Henry is in college and Jessie is a senior in high school (which doesn't make the attention of the FBI guy all that creepy in my book, the girl is either 18 or nearly so...) I am still very much enjo Very nice Revolutionary war twist on a classic secret passage mystery. I hadn't heard about the smuggling of weapons and gunpowder during the Revolutionary War so I enjoyed discovering something new. Good mystery. Also, it's interesting seeing the kids so grown up. I had to keep reminding myself that Henry is in college and Jessie is a senior in high school (which doesn't make the attention of the FBI guy all that creepy in my book, the girl is either 18 or nearly so...) I am still very much enjoying this series!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Karalynn Tyler

    This book in the Boxcar Children series was especially interesting because it had ties to American history and the Revolutionary War. My 7 year old loves when we read these books and we enjoyed this book very much. As a history teacher I also explained some of the history to him which we also enjoyed. Love that this book gave us the springboard to have good conversations about our country’s history.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Ben

    The main characters in this book are Benny, Henry, Jessie, and Violet Alden, along with their grandfather, and his sister. The book is set in New England (United States) during a time around the 1960s. The conflict is that their (Great) Aunt Jane is coming back from the West to live in New England again, so the kids grandfather buy the house that he and Jane grew up in and they fix it up for when she comes, but while their fixing it up, and when she arrives, the kids find themselves a mystery. S The main characters in this book are Benny, Henry, Jessie, and Violet Alden, along with their grandfather, and his sister. The book is set in New England (United States) during a time around the 1960s. The conflict is that their (Great) Aunt Jane is coming back from the West to live in New England again, so the kids grandfather buy the house that he and Jane grew up in and they fix it up for when she comes, but while their fixing it up, and when she arrives, the kids find themselves a mystery. Something I liked in this book was that it was a short, easy read that was still a good book with an interesting plot and varying characters. One other thing that I liked was how funny, happy, and purely innocent Benny is when it comes to just about anything. Whenever I read a Boxcar Children book, he is one of my favorite characters every time. I also liked that Andy and Jane were happy together in the end and decided to get married, after having not seen each other for a long time. One thing that I didn't like was that the author wasted time on useless things, like saying that the family ate breakfast, or that they went outside and sat on the grass. Also, I didn't like that the author sometimes seemed to leave gaps in the explaining/solving of the mystery. I would recommend this book to anybody who is able to read chapter books, who likes adventure, mystery, suspense, and/or realistic fiction, or any combination of those, and for any of you who need a quick and easy read.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Kyleigh McCurdy

    good

  5. 5 out of 5

    Mikayla

    I enjoyed revisiting this story. It felt a bit more disjointed then the others, with not nearly as much family interaction, but still very sweet.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Kaotic

    I have to flip between what rating to give these books. They aren't the worst things I've ever read, but they certainly are not great. This one actually had a mystery again, one dating back all the way to the Revolutionary War. They just magically wander into these mysteries, everything interesting happens to these very uninteresting children. They are terrible characters, there is nothing to them and everyone in the books are generic and blindingly helpful and cheerful. It's incredibly unrealis I have to flip between what rating to give these books. They aren't the worst things I've ever read, but they certainly are not great. This one actually had a mystery again, one dating back all the way to the Revolutionary War. They just magically wander into these mysteries, everything interesting happens to these very uninteresting children. They are terrible characters, there is nothing to them and everyone in the books are generic and blindingly helpful and cheerful. It's incredibly unrealistic. On a positive note I like questioning these stories and the fact that the kids are actually growing up through the books.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Nikki in Niagara

    One of the better mysteries in this wonderful children's series. All the familiar faces are back as everyone gathers together at the Aldens. For the first time the children do not go on a vacation for the summer, breaking the mold of all the previous books. Aunt Jane moves back to their part of the country, moving into the old family home. Even though the mystery is easily solved by an adult, for the first time in this series a genuine mystery with clues and ties to the past, including the Revol One of the better mysteries in this wonderful children's series. All the familiar faces are back as everyone gathers together at the Aldens. For the first time the children do not go on a vacation for the summer, breaking the mold of all the previous books. Aunt Jane moves back to their part of the country, moving into the old family home. Even though the mystery is easily solved by an adult, for the first time in this series a genuine mystery with clues and ties to the past, including the Revolutionary War bring about an exciting story making this one of the finer stories in the collection. At this point Henry is in college, Jessie a high school senior and Violet is ready to start high school after this summer so the dynamics of the children are changing too with Benny still being the only little one left. Most of the minor characters are collected here but with the marriage of one, there is also the mention that some will be leaving and I'm thinking may be departing from the series at this time, while the marriage adds a new character who could easily fill the role played by the departing characters: adventure supervisor, adult companion etc. Since I'm reading Warner's 19, I'm appreciating the flow of the basic plot continuity of reading them in numerical order as well.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Octavia Cade

    Ugh. You know, the historical aspect of this is mildly interesting - the kids investigate a mystery with its roots in the American Revolutionary War when they find old flintlocks hidden under the woodshed - but the opening is so unpleasant it spoilt the whole thing for me. Aunt Jane is moving back east, getting away from the uranium mine no doubt, so she doesn't spend the remainder of her life glowing and turning mutant. And of course Grandfather Alden, the old bastard, has to remind everyone of Ugh. You know, the historical aspect of this is mildly interesting - the kids investigate a mystery with its roots in the American Revolutionary War when they find old flintlocks hidden under the woodshed - but the opening is so unpleasant it spoilt the whole thing for me. Aunt Jane is moving back east, getting away from the uranium mine no doubt, so she doesn't spend the remainder of her life glowing and turning mutant. And of course Grandfather Alden, the old bastard, has to remind everyone of how stupid she was to stay there in the first place, when back in the day he, as her younger brother, decided she should move back east with him and left her to starve when she wouldn't jump on command. She was so stubborn, everyone agrees, but now that she's doing what she's told she's much better now. Again I say it: ugh. There's a small side track about how no-one wants to live in the Alden's old farmhouse, which Grandfather has bought for Jane now that she's knuckled under. It's shades of a haunted house story, but I reckon, historical explanation aside, it's because the whole place was permeated with Grandfather's smug nastiness and his whole horrible miasma drove every subsequent owner away.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Leanna

    Last year, I taught college English classes at a satellite campus located in a junior high school. One evening I found myself scanning the teacher’s collection of books. One caught my eye: The Woodshed Mystery. I have fond memories of reading The Boxcar Children. I remember wanting to live the Aldens’ life. I wanted to fend for myself in a boxcar—and to solve mysteries while I was at it. I read The Woodshed Mystery, and it was only vaguely what I remembered. As a child, for example, I did not cat Last year, I taught college English classes at a satellite campus located in a junior high school. One evening I found myself scanning the teacher’s collection of books. One caught my eye: The Woodshed Mystery. I have fond memories of reading The Boxcar Children. I remember wanting to live the Aldens’ life. I wanted to fend for myself in a boxcar—and to solve mysteries while I was at it. I read The Woodshed Mystery, and it was only vaguely what I remembered. As a child, for example, I did not catch the social mores of the 1940s, when Gertrude Chandler Warner started writing the series. I felt uncomfortable with many of the sexist and racist undertones of the book. Why were Violet and Jessie expected to do all of the cooking and cleaning? Because they were female? I was intrigued by one aspect of The Woodshed Mystery. The book suggests there is some sort of romance between Jessie, who is a teenager, and John Carter, who is a retired FBI agent. Oh my. I read another four books just to see how this obviously inappropriate relationship would advance. Perhaps Warner realized its inappropriateness because none of the other books mention the relationship.

  10. 4 out of 5

    ♥Xeni♥

    First off, I read these Boxcar Children books when I was a lot younger. There were some that I would read over and over and others that I read once and chucked to the back of my bookcase. Overall, though, I loved them all. The Woodshed Mystery fascinated me, at the time, because it was one of the first books that I read that dealt with the Revolutionary War. I loved hearing about the secret tunnels and the old weapons and all the battles that were fought, and the Alden family were there right al First off, I read these Boxcar Children books when I was a lot younger. There were some that I would read over and over and others that I read once and chucked to the back of my bookcase. Overall, though, I loved them all. The Woodshed Mystery fascinated me, at the time, because it was one of the first books that I read that dealt with the Revolutionary War. I loved hearing about the secret tunnels and the old weapons and all the battles that were fought, and the Alden family were there right alongside with me!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Nevada Libert

    this is a great read aloud, me and the boys really enjoyed the mystery.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Misbah

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Aunt Jane wants to move back to the village she grew up in, in the East. Grandpa Alden goes an buys a house in the village and takes the kids with him to help fix it up. When they get the house set up Aunt Jane moves in. Soon the kids are acquainted with a lot of the people there and they learn that Aunt Jane was in love with a boy that used to live on a nearby farm. He had suddenly disappeared without a trace after Jane had had a fight with him. Aunt Jane admits that she wanted to marry him but Aunt Jane wants to move back to the village she grew up in, in the East. Grandpa Alden goes an buys a house in the village and takes the kids with him to help fix it up. When they get the house set up Aunt Jane moves in. Soon the kids are acquainted with a lot of the people there and they learn that Aunt Jane was in love with a boy that used to live on a nearby farm. He had suddenly disappeared without a trace after Jane had had a fight with him. Aunt Jane admits that she wanted to marry him but she fought with him because she didn't want to take his last name, Bean. The kids discover a hidden tunnel in a woodshed attached to the house and also a place to hide people in the cellar of their house. They soon learn that someone has been living in the woodshed and they come back a few times to figure out who it is. They discover that it was Andy Bean, Aunt Janes sweetheart, who had come back to the village after all these years so that he could be with Jane again. Jane is happy to see him. He reveals that he left because he was afraid of Jane and he had still loved her all these years. He had traveled the world as a sailor and he had collected precious stones where ever he went to that he could one day give them to Jane. He proposes and she accepts and they get married. (SO SWEET! I wish love was like that in real life. Enduring through time and space.) Andy tells the kids about how he found the mysterious tunnel in the woodshed when he was a kid and he had found some artifacts in there from the revolutionary war and learned the reason for the tunnel. The house originally belonged to a couple 200 years ago. During the revolutionary war they had hid ammunition there and soldiers from their side of the war. The wife writes that because of their secret they had to cut ties with their neighbors because they were afraid someone would tell the Redcoats and they would be hanged for treason. (So cool!)

  13. 5 out of 5

    Lianna Kendig

    (LL) Damn, the kids treat people like crap in these books. They literally told a grown man that he should call himself William instead of Willie, and insinuated the same man wasn’t smart because he didn’t say much to the people who were rude as hell to him. Moreover, their stories just aren’t interesting. The only reason these kids can have these “adventures” and try and solve their “mysteries” is because their grandfather is rich and can bring them places. Boring. I’m so disappointed by these bo (LL) Damn, the kids treat people like crap in these books. They literally told a grown man that he should call himself William instead of Willie, and insinuated the same man wasn’t smart because he didn’t say much to the people who were rude as hell to him. Moreover, their stories just aren’t interesting. The only reason these kids can have these “adventures” and try and solve their “mysteries” is because their grandfather is rich and can bring them places. Boring. I’m so disappointed by these books it’s unreal.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Nessler

    Who knew that the mystery was extremely old. Everyone was afraid to live at the old Alden farm but no one could pinpoint why for sure. They knew something happened in the past and that is all. With little information to go on as usual the Alden children are on the case. Being clever and having an attention to detail is no small feat for them. A stranger comes back after so many years and is reacquainted with one of the Alden clan. Interesting book!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Olivia

    Well, this is a very cute story. Although, this is made for younger children. So, I think that this is a great book for younger ages, the older ages, well, this is proabably best for just some simple light reading. The words are easy to understand, the bigger font makes it easier to read, and the chapters are a short length. Overall, good for younger ages, who are starting to read chapter books. Enjoy!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Brooke Nadzam

    Well, Aunt Jane! You dog! In this one Aunt Jane moves back east, and what does Grandfather do for her? Buy her their childhood house, of course! How much money does this guy have??? Of course, there is a mystery involving hidden ammunition, a woodshed, and some stolen eggs. And at the end? Well, Aunt Jane is a hit forward.... Better than some of the more recent ones.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Library Queen

    I'm pretty sure I read this when I was a kid, but I don't remember any of it. It's interesting to read the older Boxcar Children stories, because they actually are aging throughout the originals, unlike the newer ones, where they are stuck at the ages from the first book. Plus, this one had a very cool bit where they talked about the Revolutionary War. I'm pretty sure I read this when I was a kid, but I don't remember any of it. It's interesting to read the older Boxcar Children stories, because they actually are aging throughout the originals, unlike the newer ones, where they are stuck at the ages from the first book. Plus, this one had a very cool bit where they talked about the Revolutionary War.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Brittany

    I selected this book for my Boxcar Book Club. They really enjoyed this one. Some of them (myself included) really liked how this book referenced the Revolutionary War. We had a small history lesson of the Revolutionary War, talked about the author and book, ate "superman pickles" as a snack, and made a Rev War powdered wig hats out of construction paper. They turned out super cute! I selected this book for my Boxcar Book Club. They really enjoyed this one. Some of them (myself included) really liked how this book referenced the Revolutionary War. We had a small history lesson of the Revolutionary War, talked about the author and book, ate "superman pickles" as a snack, and made a Rev War powdered wig hats out of construction paper. They turned out super cute!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Piper

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Okay maybe one of the cheesiest so far … if it was only that Andy Bean had come back and was hiding because he heard Jane was back maybe. But the bag full of jewels?! And they are getting married after 24 hours and they haven’t seen each other since they were kids? That’s a little far fetched and little sappy.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Ashle Oaks

    The book is different from the previous books. It explains what happened in the previous books when necessary. The children are also slightly older in this book. There’s also a history lesson tied into the story.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Laranda

    The Boxcar Children were my favourite series as a kid, and this one the most. It was rarely at the library, and when I returned to my home town it was no longer there. I finally found it as an ebook to re-read it now. Still a neat story for kids. Loved the history. Read in Nov 2018.

  22. 5 out of 5

    JP

    It's straight forward, with a nice bit of history for the mystery (which is a nice change) and the return of Aunt Jane (actually being married and happy, yay!). Not much to say. It's one of the better ones. I enjoyed it. It's straight forward, with a nice bit of history for the mystery (which is a nice change) and the return of Aunt Jane (actually being married and happy, yay!). Not much to say. It's one of the better ones. I enjoyed it.

  23. 5 out of 5

    MARYJ

    they find out Andy Bean is living in the woodshed. and under the bed they find a hole and inside they find bullets and gun powder. then in the cellar where the potato pit is they find another place to hide in. inside they find a broken plate and a broken cup. then they find a spoon too.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Hans

    Nearing the end of the stack of Boxcar Children books at home. They've come a long way from their first adventure. Henry's actually aged enough to be in college. There's apparently over 100 of these books, so I'm curious about when the children stop aging. Nearing the end of the stack of Boxcar Children books at home. They've come a long way from their first adventure. Henry's actually aged enough to be in college. There's apparently over 100 of these books, so I'm curious about when the children stop aging.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Lillian Slater

    Wow! What happened?! This is the 7th book and Henry is in college! In book number 150 he is 14. This is so much better! They actually age! Like normal people, I guess.....

  26. 4 out of 5

    Gentry

    My favorite one so far. Nice little history of the Revolutionary War.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

    Read aloud to Calvin, sometimes he wanted to sit and listen and would ask me to read more, other times he ran off to play. I guess that's how you read when you're 3. Read aloud to Calvin, sometimes he wanted to sit and listen and would ask me to read more, other times he ran off to play. I guess that's how you read when you're 3.

  28. 4 out of 5

    BefuddledPanda

    This one is a bit dated in terms of gender roles but I read it keeping in mind the context of the time it was written in.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

    The mystery here is "why is there a dirt hole under the woodshed." And there is way too much dialogue. Looking at you Benny. The mystery here is "why is there a dirt hole under the woodshed." And there is way too much dialogue. Looking at you Benny.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Brent

    Cool book good, illustrations

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