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New X-Men by Grant Morrison: Ultimate Collection, Book 1

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Sixteen million mutants dead - and that was just the beginning! In one bold stroke, writer Grant Morrison (All-Star Superman, Batman) propelled the X-Men into the 21st century, masterminding a challenging new direction for Marvel's mutant heroes that began with the destruction of Genosha and never let up. Regarded as the most innovative thinker of the current comic-book re Sixteen million mutants dead - and that was just the beginning! In one bold stroke, writer Grant Morrison (All-Star Superman, Batman) propelled the X-Men into the 21st century, masterminding a challenging new direction for Marvel's mutant heroes that began with the destruction of Genosha and never let up. Regarded as the most innovative thinker of the current comic-book renaissance, Morrison proceeded to turn the mutant-hero genre on its ear. Gone were the gaudy spandex costumes - replaced by slick, black leather and an attitude to match. Now, his entire Eisner Award-nominated run on New X-Men is collected across three titanic trade paperbacks! Collects New X-Men #114-126, and Annual 2001.


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Sixteen million mutants dead - and that was just the beginning! In one bold stroke, writer Grant Morrison (All-Star Superman, Batman) propelled the X-Men into the 21st century, masterminding a challenging new direction for Marvel's mutant heroes that began with the destruction of Genosha and never let up. Regarded as the most innovative thinker of the current comic-book re Sixteen million mutants dead - and that was just the beginning! In one bold stroke, writer Grant Morrison (All-Star Superman, Batman) propelled the X-Men into the 21st century, masterminding a challenging new direction for Marvel's mutant heroes that began with the destruction of Genosha and never let up. Regarded as the most innovative thinker of the current comic-book renaissance, Morrison proceeded to turn the mutant-hero genre on its ear. Gone were the gaudy spandex costumes - replaced by slick, black leather and an attitude to match. Now, his entire Eisner Award-nominated run on New X-Men is collected across three titanic trade paperbacks! Collects New X-Men #114-126, and Annual 2001.

30 review for New X-Men by Grant Morrison: Ultimate Collection, Book 1

  1. 5 out of 5

    myo (myonna reads)

    i love beast :(

  2. 4 out of 5

    Dan Schwent

    E is for Extinction: Convinced that humanity is doomed to be wiped out in three or four generations and replaced by mutants, telepath Cassandra Nova unleashes the Master Mold sentinels on Genosha. Can the X-Men stop her? I have a confession to make. The last issue of the X-Men I bought before this had Jim Lee doing the art so I was slightly out of the loop. Never the less, I enjoyed the first arc in this collection. The scope and the dialogue are vintage Grant Morrison, as is the shaking up of th E is for Extinction: Convinced that humanity is doomed to be wiped out in three or four generations and replaced by mutants, telepath Cassandra Nova unleashes the Master Mold sentinels on Genosha. Can the X-Men stop her? I have a confession to make. The last issue of the X-Men I bought before this had Jim Lee doing the art so I was slightly out of the loop. Never the less, I enjoyed the first arc in this collection. The scope and the dialogue are vintage Grant Morrison, as is the shaking up of the status quo a bit by wiping out most of Genosha. Cassandra Nova was a pretty vile villain and I doubt I've seen the last of her. Professor X showed he has testicles like grapefruits in the conclusion of the story. The Man From Room X: The X-Men got to China to stop a mutant organ trafficking ring, only to run afoul of the U-Men, humans getting grafts from mutants to take their powers. The second story in the collection had two things going against it for me. It was sideways and Frank Quitley didn't do the art. Other than that, I enjoyed the interplay between Cyclops and Emma Frost. Xorn seemed more like a Doom Patrol character than an X-Man. On a related note, I always thought it was weird when Marvel wooed Vertigo writers away from DC and stuck them on superhero titles. The third story in the book is untitled as far as I can tell. A bird-faced mutant called Adrien Brody, I mean The Beak, is introduced, Logan and Jean Grey share a moment, and Xavier leaves to spend some time with Llandra and the Shi'ar. It's an okay issue but has some chilling implications at the end. Damn that Cassandra Nova is sinister! Germ Free Generation: The conflict with John Sublime and the U-Men comes to a conclusion. Emma and Cyclops are captured, Wolverine recruits a bug-winged girl named Angel, and Sublime's forces storm a certain school for gifted youngsters... This story was well worth the read. The background plot with Cassandra Nova advanced quite a bit, and the John Sublime plot came to conclusion of sorts. Silence: Psychic Rescue in Progress: Jean Grey and Emma Frost enter Cassandra Nova's mind. What will they find? This story was fairly brief. There was very little text but what little there was was powerful. The origin of Cassandra Nova was revealed! Imperial: In the aftermath of learning what transpired between Cassandra Nova, the X-Men prepare for the Shi'ar's arrival on Earth... Imperial was mostly setup but I have a feeling the payoff is going to be huge. I'm a little surprised that The Gladiator hasn't made an appearance yet. Testament: Just as the Beast figures out the origin of the flu that's plaguing the school, the Shi'ar Imperial Guard arrive... Yep. Gladiator showed up. Meanwhile, Cyclops and Xorn are held captive aboard the Shi'ar flagship. Carnage ensues. Losers: Cyclops and Xorn escape Shi'ar captivity and Jean Grey prepares for the inevitable... The thing about Grant Morrison that always sparks my interest is how he uses the powers of characters in new ways. In Batman RIP, he infected a bunch of ninjas with the Man-Bat serum. In this book... I'm excited for the final issue of this collection. With the combined might of the X-Men and the Shi'ar Imperial Guard, I can't see how Cassandra Nova can survive... All Hell: The story of Cassandra Nova comes to its conclusion... Yeah, the ending was worthwhile and the trip getting there was completely worth it. Conclusion: I was eager to see what Grant Morrison would do with the X-Men and I wasn't disappointed. Despite my last exposure to the X-Men being sometime in the mid-90's, I had no trouble following the story. Morrison brought his sense of scope to the title and elevated a bit in my estimation. (view spoiler)[How many other writers have had a run that included the destruction of Genosha, Xavier's unborn twin, and attempted mutant genocide by the Shi'ar? (hide spoiler)] I give this an easy four and urge fans of both the X-Men and Grant Morrison to seek it out. It's damn good.

  3. 4 out of 5

    James DeSantis

    Every single time I open a Grant Morrison comic I fear for the worst. So, when it's good, I'm fucking HAPPY. Luckily, like his Batman and Robin or We3 comic, Morrison's New X-men starts off with a bang. So what's this about? Well after the successful X-Men movie they decided the X-Men comics needed a revamp. Don't blame them at all. Who better than the guy who fixed Justice League? So we take out all the extra X-Men and focus on a few, mostly the originals, or more famous ones. Got Beast, Jean, Every single time I open a Grant Morrison comic I fear for the worst. So, when it's good, I'm fucking HAPPY. Luckily, like his Batman and Robin or We3 comic, Morrison's New X-men starts off with a bang. So what's this about? Well after the successful X-Men movie they decided the X-Men comics needed a revamp. Don't blame them at all. Who better than the guy who fixed Justice League? So we take out all the extra X-Men and focus on a few, mostly the originals, or more famous ones. Got Beast, Jean, Cyclops, Wolverine, and more. But it focuses on them so much that each encounter feels fresh. You also have Xavier as a key role and something major happens with a long lose sibling. Oh, and like the back of the book states, millions of mutants die. Talk about a "oh shit" start. Good: Really dug all the interactions. Wolverine is both funny and charming here. I thought the fights were great, gritty, and brutal. The twist and turns keep coming and you feel like people can ACTUALLY die. I also thought the story, despite getting a bit bizarre closer to the end, is still really interesting. Bad: The art. I know it's unique. I Love Jupiter's Legacy. But damn, it's rough here. Some of the female characters look fucking horrendous. Also, towards the end gets a bit too weird and shifts to the bizarre Morrison side. Overall this is great. Extremely entertaining, solid dialog, and good pacing. Grant, when good, is damn good, it's a shame he's usually fucking insane. This is worth reading though for sure. A 4 out of 5.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Sesana

    At this point, people have been saying great things about Morrison's run on X-Men for so many years that I couldn't go in without expectations. Add in that I generally like him as a writer. He may strike out on occasion, but it's because he's swinging big. So yes, I was expecting quite a bit, but I also basically knew where he might fall short. And yes, all was as I expected. Morrison took some chances, and did some things that are unusual in superhero comics. A lot more talk, a lot less action, At this point, people have been saying great things about Morrison's run on X-Men for so many years that I couldn't go in without expectations. Add in that I generally like him as a writer. He may strike out on occasion, but it's because he's swinging big. So yes, I was expecting quite a bit, but I also basically knew where he might fall short. And yes, all was as I expected. Morrison took some chances, and did some things that are unusual in superhero comics. A lot more talk, a lot less action, for one. Morrison's trademark weird concepts. And very high stakes. If I had read this back when I was sick of X-Men, it might have given me a second wind and kept me reading, at least for awhile longer. But it isn't perfect, of course, in the way that Morrison's work tends to fall short. Concept before characters, always. This volume, at least, was interesting enough and moved quickly enough that I was engaged anyways. And for me, it was kind of sad to see just how developed mutant culture had become before the events of House of M. Alas.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Rory Wilding

    By the time Grant Morrison – known for his work on DC and Vertigo such as The Invisibles and JLA – stepped into the Marvel universe and became the new writer for the main X-Men series, the mutant superhero team were at an interesting point in their history as not only Chris Claremont and Jim Lee relaunched the comic which led to the popular 1992 animated series, but their cinematic debut in 2000 spawned a re-emergence of superhero films. With the X-Men being as popular as Spider-Man at this poin By the time Grant Morrison – known for his work on DC and Vertigo such as The Invisibles and JLA – stepped into the Marvel universe and became the new writer for the main X-Men series, the mutant superhero team were at an interesting point in their history as not only Chris Claremont and Jim Lee relaunched the comic which led to the popular 1992 animated series, but their cinematic debut in 2000 spawned a re-emergence of superhero films. With the X-Men being as popular as Spider-Man at this point in time, what better way than for Grant Morrison to step into the mutant world and shake it up. Opening with the story arc “E is for Extinction”, a new generation of mutants begins maturing across the globe, whilst a long-lost Master Mold A.I. and Sentinel production facility in the jungles of Ecuador is uncovered by a mysterious woman called Cassandra Nova. As always with Morrison when it comes to superheroes, he looks back at the history of the X-Men and brings it forward whilst revamping the whole presentation such as the concept of secondary mutations, expanding the X-Mansion from simply a training centre to a legitimate school with dozens of mutant students, while the group abandoned their traditional spandex costumes for leather jackets and conservative turtle-neck sweaters. No doubt these changes evoked controversy amongst the fans and certainly events like the destruction of Genosha sets up a dark tone for the rest of Morrison’s tone. Very steeped into the continuity that Chris Claremont established throughout his long run, Morrison is very heavy on ideas as he branches many forms of science-fiction from genetics to intergalactic affairs. No doubt there is a lot to wrap your brain around and yet like the best X-Men stories, no matter how outlandish these super-powered figures can be, it is youthful outsiders trying to survive in a world consumed by prejudice. No one epitomises more than Barnell Bohusk as the bird-like mutated Beak whose physical appearance and oddball personality makes him isolated even amongst his mutant classmates. The biggest issue with this book is its artistic inconsistency as it starts great with Morrison’s long-time collaborator Frank Quitely whose quirky yet highly detailed artwork brings a unique look to the X-Men and their world. Two sequences that definitely display his artistic brilliance; one is the destruction of Genosha, a compelling action sequence which was strangely realised months later by the true horrors of 9/11; and two is the entirety of #121 where Jean Grey and Emma Frost pair up to travel through the labyrinthine mind of Xavier whilst discovering the truth behind Cassandra Nova. Although I do wish Quitely drew every issue, most of the other artists do shine if not as successfully including Leinil Francis Yu whose artwork was published in the sideways "Widescreen" format which is a confusing read. While Ethan Van Sciver has a detail-oriented style that rivals Quitely, I can’t say the same about Igor Kordey whose rough sketching is tough to read that it slums down Morrison’s extravagant storytelling. For a newcomer what wishes to get into the adventures of the X-Men, Grant Morrison’s New X-Men would not be an ideal start but it is a recommendation for those who are fans the Scot’s high ideas and how he nicely steps into the pages of Marvel.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Anne

    Whew! That was fun! Morrison may be better known for his work with Batman, but the guy has a real talent for the X-Men, too. I'm hoping the other volumes are at least half this good! Whew! That was fun! Morrison may be better known for his work with Batman, but the guy has a real talent for the X-Men, too. I'm hoping the other volumes are at least half this good!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Mike

    Five stars for the writing (despite the hit-or-miss art). Morrison pulls a great rebirth for the X-Men by imbuing them with real life and dimension that was sorely lacking. Made me care about the characters and their universe again, carving jagged edges into their psyches and weaknesses, without the easy cop-out of whininess and tedious, superficial intra-team conflict. But boy would I like to see these scripts redrawn by a consistently awesome group of artists.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Sam Quixote

    Grant Morrison began his run on "New X-Men" 11 years ago but still the series reads as fresh today as it did back then. He sets the tone quickly by having a psychotic psychic beget a genocide killing millions of mutants and then sets off for the stars to bring in the Shi'Ar to battle the X-Men. Suffice it to say, Morrison brings it. What an epic start to one of Marvel's best loved series! From the Ecuadoran jungle with the Sentinel Factory at the start, heading back to Westchester, then space, ev Grant Morrison began his run on "New X-Men" 11 years ago but still the series reads as fresh today as it did back then. He sets the tone quickly by having a psychotic psychic beget a genocide killing millions of mutants and then sets off for the stars to bring in the Shi'Ar to battle the X-Men. Suffice it to say, Morrison brings it. What an epic start to one of Marvel's best loved series! From the Ecuadoran jungle with the Sentinel Factory at the start, heading back to Westchester, then space, even journeying into Xavier's mind! This large, nearly 400-page first volume collecting Grant Morrison's 3 year run on the series, contains too much to go into in a mere review. Not all of the X-Men are included in Morrison's version, the core remains Xavier, Cyclops, Jean Grey, Beast, Emma Frost, and of course Wolverine. Rogue and Storm are left out, maybe to included later, while Morrison and Quitely revise the X-Men's outfits to look less colourful and comic-book-y - the end result is pretty awesome though Emma Frost's "flesh X" you can see on the cover makes her look like a Amsterdam hooker than a teacher. I thought Cassandra Nova was an excellent villain, a character I'd never heard of before and a challenge for all of the X-Men to defeat. Her methods of destruction - the decimation of confidence, character, and personality - was an interesting way of fighting without using physical force. It's abstract but this is Morrison writing so you've got to expect that. Plus the hyper-surreal silent issue where Jean and Emma journey into Xavier's tormented mind was fantastic, full props to Frank Quitely for pulling it off so masterfully. There are lots of nice touches in the story throughout and any fans of the X-Men will enjoy the book. The art varies in quality with Frank Quitely setting the gold standard (he's definitely one of my favourite comics artists ever) and Igor Kordey going for rougher, more sketchy kind of pencils for his issues. Morrison's writing throughout is as great as ever and his treatment of Hank McCoy aka Beast was particularly nice to see as that character often gets short shrift. X-Men fans will love this, highly recommended.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Samantha

    Highlights: -Jean Grey: Usually her character either bores or annoys me but I'm really loving her arc in this one. Can't wait to see more of Jean in the next volume. Emma was also pretty fun here. -Cassandra Nova Plot: Really interesting plot going on here around Cassandra and her determination to wipe out mutants. The annoying things: -Emma Frost's costume: Because seriously, 99% of the time I have no idea what is holding the material onto her chest. Does she super-glue that stuff to her skin or wh Highlights: -Jean Grey: Usually her character either bores or annoys me but I'm really loving her arc in this one. Can't wait to see more of Jean in the next volume. Emma was also pretty fun here. -Cassandra Nova Plot: Really interesting plot going on here around Cassandra and her determination to wipe out mutants. The annoying things: -Emma Frost's costume: Because seriously, 99% of the time I have no idea what is holding the material onto her chest. Does she super-glue that stuff to her skin or what? -So many plot threads: There are at least 3 major plots going on at once here (Cassandra Nova, Mutant Organ Harvesting, and a Rise in Mutant Hate/Mutant Births/Development of 2nd Mutations). Having so many major events happening at once, things things often felt rushed or got jumbled together. It was a little confusing trying to figure out which emergency the characters were attempting to deal with at certain points. All in all, a really good read. I'll be picking up Book 2 soon.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Sans

    For me, Morrison is to comics what George Lucas is to films: great ideas, less than stellar execution (especially when paired with Quitely's art, which...I really don't like. This also explains why I haven't been able to finish The Authority vol 2 for nearly two months). This book was bonkers. I don't know how much of that is me having zero background in X-Men history for the blahblah number of years between Age of Apocalypse and this series run, and how much is just pure weirdness born from the For me, Morrison is to comics what George Lucas is to films: great ideas, less than stellar execution (especially when paired with Quitely's art, which...I really don't like. This also explains why I haven't been able to finish The Authority vol 2 for nearly two months). This book was bonkers. I don't know how much of that is me having zero background in X-Men history for the blahblah number of years between Age of Apocalypse and this series run, and how much is just pure weirdness born from the simple fact this is a Morrison story. So...if you love Morrison, you'll love this. If you're "meh" about him and don't have a deep-rooted love for the X-family, you might be as lost as I was. I'll read the next volume. Just not right now.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Ronny Trøjborg

    The story in this is just not that good, and the art is just plain awful. Might be the worst art I've ever seen in a Comicbook so far. Jean looks like an very old prof. X with a wig, what is going on with Emma frost uniform and don't get me started on wolverine. The story in this is just not that good, and the art is just plain awful. Might be the worst art I've ever seen in a Comicbook so far. Jean looks like an very old prof. X with a wig, what is going on with Emma frost uniform and don't get me started on wolverine.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

    The art was a distraction to me, in a bad way. Had a hard time getting into the story.

  13. 5 out of 5

    RG

    Morrison did a great job with this New xmen collection. A great story with the old favourite xmen characters with a pretty amazing antagonist. Got a little weird with some plotting and developments in the story but still alot of fun. The artwork was very cool. Its alwsys cool to see how different artists potray certain cult characters.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Dylan

    hit a bit of a reading snag lately so I decided to remedy that by buying an ipad and getting back into comics. going well so far! haven't read this one in ages and it holds up. grant morrison GOAT, obviously. emma frost is my hero and I would like to bang wolverine. hit a bit of a reading snag lately so I decided to remedy that by buying an ipad and getting back into comics. going well so far! haven't read this one in ages and it holds up. grant morrison GOAT, obviously. emma frost is my hero and I would like to bang wolverine.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Chelsea 🏳️‍🌈

    I enjoyed 90% of the writing in this book but I good god, I hated the artwork. The women are drawn horribly and I don't just mean some of the outfit choices for Emma Frost. Their proportions and shapes are skewed and odd and the artist clearly doesn't think we have bone structure?? Don't get me started on the way Angel was drawn because I'll be here all day. Usually, I'll make one brief comment about artwork I don't like and move on to the story but this artwork was distractingly bad. It it defi I enjoyed 90% of the writing in this book but I good god, I hated the artwork. The women are drawn horribly and I don't just mean some of the outfit choices for Emma Frost. Their proportions and shapes are skewed and odd and the artist clearly doesn't think we have bone structure?? Don't get me started on the way Angel was drawn because I'll be here all day. Usually, I'll make one brief comment about artwork I don't like and move on to the story but this artwork was distractingly bad. It it definitely what made me pick 4 stars instead of 5. Anyway, this is easy to jump into if you have no knowledge of the X-men characters. They do reference Phoenix's past but that's really it. I love Emma as always and Wolverine is a joy as usual. I think the writer likes Beast because this is the most I've seen a series focus on him. He was pretty funny and I felt for his struggle to feel human. The last story with the Shi'ar empire bored me. Honestly, I tend to not care for galactic characters in the Marvel universe, aside from the Guardians of the Galaxy and the Inhumans, if they count. So, there was that and the storyline was a little hard to follow. Not great. Until that, I enjoyed the book. You really get a feel for the way the public treats the mutant community and it was saddening. The mutants remain a metaphor for ostracized and oppressed minorities. As a last note, Jean Grey continues to slay me. I adore her.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Saadiq Wolford

    If, like me, you're getting back in to comics after many years away, the general consensus is that Morrison's run on New X-Men and Joss Whedon's run on Astonishing X-Men are both excellent starting places, and I found this volume very accessible to the casual fan. The story line is epic - with moments of humor and character development sprinkled throughout - and the resolution is memorable for its cleverness. Having said that, I felt that Morrison's portrayal of the aftermath of the genocide on G If, like me, you're getting back in to comics after many years away, the general consensus is that Morrison's run on New X-Men and Joss Whedon's run on Astonishing X-Men are both excellent starting places, and I found this volume very accessible to the casual fan. The story line is epic - with moments of humor and character development sprinkled throughout - and the resolution is memorable for its cleverness. Having said that, I felt that Morrison's portrayal of the aftermath of the genocide on Genosha gave short shrift to the level of grief and angst such a holocaust would create; it lacked authenticity and seemed merely a plot point for Morrison (which, in the end, it really is). Finally, I found the inconsistency of the art from issue to issue distracting. Quitely's work is impressive - if somewhat an acquired taste - but Igor Kordey's work was so dreadful that, in this instance, it had no business being in any book, let alone an A-list title.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Shannon Appelcline

    E is for Extinction (#114-116). Morrison's debut on the New X-Men turns out to be one of his weaker arcs. Oh, there's delightful storytelling here, great characterization, and the wonderful intro of Emma to the main team (and the similarly wonderful introduction of Casandra Nova, though she doesn't really come into her own until later arcs). And of course we get the rather shocking destruction of Genosha, so critical in the Magneto Rex era, just tossed away now. But, this story also feels a bit E is for Extinction (#114-116). Morrison's debut on the New X-Men turns out to be one of his weaker arcs. Oh, there's delightful storytelling here, great characterization, and the wonderful intro of Emma to the main team (and the similarly wonderful introduction of Casandra Nova, though she doesn't really come into her own until later arcs). And of course we get the rather shocking destruction of Genosha, so critical in the Magneto Rex era, just tossed away now. But, this story also feels a bit too plot-driven, not really giving Morrison's SF concepts and superb characters enough chance to shine [4/5]. The Man from Room X (Annual '01). I hate, hate, hate the sideways art in this issue. It was hard to read in the comics, harder to read in the trades, and even harder to read in the Omnibus. There's just no point. As for the intro of Xorn: that's intriguing, although at some point one must go back and ask how much of this story is a lie (and how much has been retconned by less competent authors) [3/5]. Danger Rooms (#117). This is mostly the ramp-up of the Cassandra Nova story, and it's shocking (while also nicely highlighting some of the new kids at the institute) [5/5]. Germ-Free Generation (#118-120). Morrison's best arc to date. The idea of the U-Man stealing body parts from mutants is entirely cringeworthy, while it really feels like some of our main characters are in serious danger in a very tense action sequence. All around, delightful for both the world development and the plotting [5+/5]. Silence (#121). One of the 'Nuff Said stories. Perhaps, Morrison does better than most, and there's a great revelation about Cassandra Nova in this story, but as with most of these 'Nuff Said stories, a regular story with dialogue would have been better [4/5]. Imperial (#122-126). Morrison closes out his first year by concluding the story of Cassandra Nova on the galactic scale. He makes great use of the Shi'ar and the Imperial Guard, and really uses them to portray the dangerous scope of Nova. We also get more great characterization (including a fun buddy romp with Scott and Xorn). However the best thing may be how Morrison opens up the scope of the school, giving some of the new students, the Cuckoos, a real focus in the story [5/5].

  18. 4 out of 5

    Danny

    This could be considered the ultimate Grant Morrison comic. It has the complexity of his mind found in such works as Arkham Asylum, but the same heart and wholesomeness as something like All Star Superman. And boy was I impressed with how he created genuinely new societal problems to tackle so as not to feel constricted with the same race analogies as so many previous authors tackled. It's still there but with a fresh take that many could not come up with. Also the idea of a philanthropist tryin This could be considered the ultimate Grant Morrison comic. It has the complexity of his mind found in such works as Arkham Asylum, but the same heart and wholesomeness as something like All Star Superman. And boy was I impressed with how he created genuinely new societal problems to tackle so as not to feel constricted with the same race analogies as so many previous authors tackled. It's still there but with a fresh take that many could not come up with. Also the idea of a philanthropist trying to synthesize a drug for humans to also become mutants as a belief for the next step in evolution? GENIUS! Complaints are that it does tend to be hard to follow with the over the top sci fi, and I wish it was only Frank Quietly on art duties because he can do no wrong in my very humble opinion. Grant, you are king.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Derrick

    Emma Frost Rules I decided to go back and revisit these Grant Morrison stories because I read that they are a good prelude to the current Hickman run. I already agree after just one collection, with elements and characterizations being carried over. There’s even a silent episode with Jean and Emma that Hickman reuses/homages in one of his giant-size books. What comes out best for me in this reading is how freaking awesome Emma Frost is. Also, I find I don’t like Quitely’s art as much as I used to, Emma Frost Rules I decided to go back and revisit these Grant Morrison stories because I read that they are a good prelude to the current Hickman run. I already agree after just one collection, with elements and characterizations being carried over. There’s even a silent episode with Jean and Emma that Hickman reuses/homages in one of his giant-size books. What comes out best for me in this reading is how freaking awesome Emma Frost is. Also, I find I don’t like Quitely’s art as much as I used to, so I was grateful he didn’t do every issue.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Kyle Bateman

    I know I’m in the minority here, but a lot of this stuff just does not hold up at all. And some of the artwork is just atrocious, specifically anything by Igor Kordey. His art looks like an amateur trying to emulate Quitely and Van Sciver at the same time, artists that also work on this run. It really doesn’t feel like Morrison finds his footing until the second half of his run. This first bath of issues is extremely hit and miss though for me personally.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Chris W

    It's OK. Beast is portrayed very well and his probably the best character. Cassandra nova is a decent villain. It's just the outer space element is where it starts to fall apart for me. It gets too wacky and involves unnecessary characters that take away from the story rather than add to it. Overall it's good but not great in my opinion. 3.5 stars It's OK. Beast is portrayed very well and his probably the best character. Cassandra nova is a decent villain. It's just the outer space element is where it starts to fall apart for me. It gets too wacky and involves unnecessary characters that take away from the story rather than add to it. Overall it's good but not great in my opinion. 3.5 stars

  22. 5 out of 5

    Justyn Rampa

    Unfortunately, I did not love this as much as I would have hoped. I do believe Grant Morrison is a genius, but sometimes that means things may get a little messy:-/ Where to start? The whole premise is very intricate and well planned. A nice rethinking of the sentinels and humanity's reaction to the X-gene. Things get a little convoluted when Shi'ar empire is brought in to the fold. I'll be honest, any time the X-men are involved in outer space, I find it a bit boring. There were three artists in t Unfortunately, I did not love this as much as I would have hoped. I do believe Grant Morrison is a genius, but sometimes that means things may get a little messy:-/ Where to start? The whole premise is very intricate and well planned. A nice rethinking of the sentinels and humanity's reaction to the X-gene. Things get a little convoluted when Shi'ar empire is brought in to the fold. I'll be honest, any time the X-men are involved in outer space, I find it a bit boring. There were three artists in this volume: Frank Quietly, Ethan Van Sciver, and Igor Kordey. While Frank Quietly is a long time Grant Morrison collaborator, I feel he is not a great fit for X-Men. I grew to love his work during Morrison's Batman and Robin work. Ethan Van Sciver is the best artist for this series in my opinion and draws the X-Men very well indeed. Igor Kordey is a hot mess. His drawing seems sloppy and botched. The story loses serious points during the issues he illustrates. Constantly changing between the three men likely hurt the fluidity of the storyline. There were some good additions. I loved Emma Frost and the Stepford Cuckoos. They were pure dead brilliant. I think Xorn has potential to be a very cool character. There were also ideas that were very interesting including the U-Men and humans wanting to graft mutant parts to their party to create a new race. I found this very compelling at times and would likely read the next volume because I want to like the X-Men, but so many times I am left wanting. Ah well, the quest for the perfect X-Men comic continues!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Joe S

    Whee!!! This was just fun shit. No pretention, no patronizing, but also no lowest-common-denominator tripe. I love Morrison when he does serial comics, because he knows a year in advance exactly where the story is going to go, and that lets him slow down and actually do decent story-telling with real characters. There's a reason everyone brings him in to revive characters that have been beaten into two dimensions by other shitty writers. Also, I take back what I said about Quitely in my review on Whee!!! This was just fun shit. No pretention, no patronizing, but also no lowest-common-denominator tripe. I love Morrison when he does serial comics, because he knows a year in advance exactly where the story is going to go, and that lets him slow down and actually do decent story-telling with real characters. There's a reason everyone brings him in to revive characters that have been beaten into two dimensions by other shitty writers. Also, I take back what I said about Quitely in my review on The Authority, in which I suggested that he can draw no other face but Richard Nixon's. I still half believe that, but he toned it down some for X-Men and was honestly the best artist shown in this collection. There are a few issues in here pencilled by Igor Kordey, and they offended my sensibilities greatly. I found myself begging for more Quitely. I originally read this because I was putting together a syllabus on graphic novels as literature, and wanted something recent to contrast the old Dark Phoenix Saga. Pssht. Morrison suckered me in by the third page, and I was all dweeb from there on. The only reason I don't give this hotness five stars is that someone let Kordey pencil three issues with his left hand. Volume 2, here I come.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Amal El-Mohtar

    I love the X-Men. I was introduced to them by a friend named Xavier when I was 10, which is the reason I call him X to this day. I had no sense of continuity whatsoever; I read whatever he had to give me, and then Generation X and some What Ifs, and I followed the animated series and have watched the films. I don't have anything like an encyclopaedic knowledge of the comics, or who was responsible for what run when with which artist, at all. I just knew Storm and Jean were my favourites and I wa I love the X-Men. I was introduced to them by a friend named Xavier when I was 10, which is the reason I call him X to this day. I had no sense of continuity whatsoever; I read whatever he had to give me, and then Generation X and some What Ifs, and I followed the animated series and have watched the films. I don't have anything like an encyclopaedic knowledge of the comics, or who was responsible for what run when with which artist, at all. I just knew Storm and Jean were my favourites and I wanted elemental powers and also telepathy and telekinesis because obviously. Anyway the most recent X-Men thing I read before this was Avengers vs. X-Men, which was awful. It was so bad. But my Glaswegian recommended that I try Grant Morrison's run, and I have frequently enjoyed his stuff, so I did. This was REALLY REALLY GOOD. The Cassandra Nova plotline was scary, the devastation of Genosha was exactly that, and Morrison's take on the sentinels was super creepy. Also the writing was GOOD! The dialogue had me giggling! The characters talked to each other (mostly) about feelings! I loved seeing Wolverine and Cyclops getting along! I quickly read volumes 2 and 3, but like most book-shaped things that come in 3s, ended up not liking the third very much. More on that later.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jordan Lahn

    So far not blown away by this "legendary" X-Men run. Maybe that's because I've never really been a big X-Men fan before. The first few arcs heavily revolve around the inevitable evolution of the human race and the various different advanced subspecies competing for domination (mutants, u-men, and whatever Cassandra Nova is supposed to be), and it gets pretty heavy pretty fast. It's a new experience for me reading an X-Men book where Charles Xavier is alive and leading the Xavier school. Not sure So far not blown away by this "legendary" X-Men run. Maybe that's because I've never really been a big X-Men fan before. The first few arcs heavily revolve around the inevitable evolution of the human race and the various different advanced subspecies competing for domination (mutants, u-men, and whatever Cassandra Nova is supposed to be), and it gets pretty heavy pretty fast. It's a new experience for me reading an X-Men book where Charles Xavier is alive and leading the Xavier school. Not sure I like him. lol And unfortunately the art is not doing it for me. All of the characters look like weird mutated caricatures of themselves. Flipping through the second volume, it looks like the art has improved significantly, so I'll give it another chance. On a positive note, Emma Frost is one of my favorite X-Men characters (when she isn't being ridiculously hypersexualized), and while this isn't her first appearance it seems to be the point at which she becomes a major player on the X-Men team. I'm loving her jaded, cynical comments, and looking forward to her character continuing to develop.

  26. 4 out of 5

    The Sapphic Nerd

    Pretty good story. It feels like a big telepath party, but I'm not complaining because I love Jean Grey and Emma Frost. They make up about 90% of the humour and amusement I get out of this book and their interactions with each other are the best parts. I'd never read much Jean Grey before so reading her here is cool. She's a badass, that's for sure. Her level head under pressure and insane powers are perfectly complemented by Emma's sarcasm and bitchiness (I mean that in the most delightful way) Pretty good story. It feels like a big telepath party, but I'm not complaining because I love Jean Grey and Emma Frost. They make up about 90% of the humour and amusement I get out of this book and their interactions with each other are the best parts. I'd never read much Jean Grey before so reading her here is cool. She's a badass, that's for sure. Her level head under pressure and insane powers are perfectly complemented by Emma's sarcasm and bitchiness (I mean that in the most delightful way). I couldn't help giggling at the X-Men's grins when they were being invaded and Jean just says, "And can I just remind everyone that Emma is still on the loose?" The art is another story. I'm not fond of it in the slightest. It looks abnormal and creepy, with the exception of a handful of panels. Characters look disproportionate and morphed a lot of the time, and just plain ugly. How they got away with doing this run without switching artists or art styles is beyond me. Oh well. Overall, I like it. Jean and Emma made it a lot better for me. Without them, it's still a decent book, but it'd be a lot less interesting.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Alex

    This first large collection of Grant Morrison's New X-Men remains one of my favourite comic book collections ever. Back when I first read it I kept going over it again and again because (in my mind at least) Morrison handled the X-Men in a way that they hadn't quite been written before. Highlights for me include the silent issue, where Quitely's art manages to carry the story forward in spectacular fashion even in the absence of any dialogue, the way Morrison writes Emma Frost, the way that the This first large collection of Grant Morrison's New X-Men remains one of my favourite comic book collections ever. Back when I first read it I kept going over it again and again because (in my mind at least) Morrison handled the X-Men in a way that they hadn't quite been written before. Highlights for me include the silent issue, where Quitely's art manages to carry the story forward in spectacular fashion even in the absence of any dialogue, the way Morrison writes Emma Frost, the way that the Cassandra Nova storyline delves into Professor Xavier's character, the balance between super-heroics and the personal storylines of the staff and students. I love Morrison's entire run on this title, and it's one of the books that really cemented my love of the X-Men, but this first book is far and away my favourite.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jasmine

    I'm conflicted. On the one hand, the dialogue is absolutely amazing. Every word that proceedeth from the mouth of Emma is pure gold, I love Hank, I even liked Jean! But on the other hand, everything to do with Cassandra Nova is terrible and weird. Like, what-have-you-been-smoking weird. So I don't know really know how to feel about this run. Also, Cassandra Nova was terrifying, but the third-species people were somehow more frightening and repugnant. Because I feel like a bunch of that dialogue I'm conflicted. On the one hand, the dialogue is absolutely amazing. Every word that proceedeth from the mouth of Emma is pure gold, I love Hank, I even liked Jean! But on the other hand, everything to do with Cassandra Nova is terrible and weird. Like, what-have-you-been-smoking weird. So I don't know really know how to feel about this run. Also, Cassandra Nova was terrifying, but the third-species people were somehow more frightening and repugnant. Because I feel like a bunch of that dialogue was drawn from history, with the nouns changed.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Tamahome

    It's been a while. I was just talking about Grant Morrison with ppl. I remember it being creative. You can't go wrong with Frank Quitely as the artist. It's been a while. I was just talking about Grant Morrison with ppl. I remember it being creative. You can't go wrong with Frank Quitely as the artist.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Ryan Scicluna

    An amazing concept for a story and a very good debut for Grant Morrison writing the X-Men. Really enjoyed this collection and hoping the other volumes deliver the same.

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